October 24, 2017

CFP: Special Issue of JCLIS on Libraries and Archives in the Anthropocene

CFP:

Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies (JCLIS) — Special Issue on Libraries and Archives in the Anthropocene

Guest Editors: John Burgess, Robert D. Montoya, Eira Tansey

As stewards of collective knowledge, librarians, archivists, and educators in the information fields are facing the realities of the Anthropocene, which has the potential for cataclysmic environmental change, with a dawning awareness of its unique implications for their missions and activities. The Anthropocene is a proposed designation for an epoch of geological time in which human activity has led to significant and irrevocable changes to the Earth’s atmosphere, geology, and biosphere. Some professionals in these fields are focusing new energies on the need for environmentally sustainable practices in their institutions. Some are prioritizing the role of libraries and archives in supporting climate change communication and influencing government policy and public awareness. Others foresee an inevitable unraveling of systems and ponder the role of libraries and archives in a world much different from the one we take for granted. Climate disruption, continued reliance on fossil fuels, toxic waste, deforestation, soil exhaustion, agricultural crisis, depletion of groundwater, loss of biodiversity, mass migration, sea level rise, and extreme weather events are problems that threaten to overwhelm civilization’s knowledge infrastructures, and present information institutions with unprecedented challenges.

This special issue of the Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies (JCLIS) will serve as a space to explore these challenges and establish directions for future efforts and investigations. We invite proposals from academics, librarians, archivists, activists, museum professionals, and others.

Some suggested topics and questions:
– How can information institutions operate more sustainably?
– How can information scholars and professionals better serve the needs of policy discussions and public awareness with respect to climate change and other threats to the environment?
– How can information institutions support skillsets and technologies that are relevant following systemic unraveling?
What will information work look like without the infrastructures we take for granted?
– How does information literacy instruction intersect with ecoliteracy?
– How can information professionals support or participate in radical environmental activism?
– What are the implications of climate change for disaster preparedness?
– What role do information workers have in addressing issues of environmental justice? How do such issues of environmental justice relate to other forms of social justice?
– What are the implications of climate change for preservation practices?
– Should we question the wisdom of preserving access to the technological cultural legacy that has led to the current environmental crisis? Why or why not?
– Is there a responsibility to document, as a mode of bearing witness, society’s confrontation with the causes of significant environmental problems?
– Given the ideological foundations of libraries and archives in Enlightenment thought, and given that Enlightenment civilization may be leading to its own environmental endpoint, are these ideological foundations called into question? And with what consequences?
– What role do MLIS, MIS, iSchools, and other graduate (and undergraduate) programs have to play in relation to the aforementioned issues?

Deadline for Submission: June 30, 2018

Types of Submissions

JCLIS welcomes the following types of submissions:
Research Articles (no more than 7,000 words)
Perspective Essays (no more than 5,000 words)
Literature Reviews (no more than 7,000 words)
Interviews (no more than 5,000 words)
Book or Exhibition Reviews (no more than 1,200 words)

Research articles and literature reviews are subject to peer review by two referees. Perspective essays are subject to peer review by one referee. Interviews and book or exhibition reviews are subject to review by the issue editor(s).

Contacts

Please direct questions to the guest editors for the issue:
John Burgess, University of Alabama: jtfburgess@ua.edu
Robert D. Montoya, Indiana University, Bloomington: montoya@indiana.edu
Eira Tansey, University of Cincinnati: eira.tansey@uc.edu

Submission Guidelines for Authors

The Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies welcomes submissions from senior and junior faculty, students, activists, and practitioners working in areas of research and practice at the intersection of critical theory and library and information studies.
Authors retain the copyright to material they publish in the JCLIS, but the Journal cannot re-publish material that has previously been published elsewhere. The journal also cannot accept manuscripts that have been simultaneously submitted to another outlet for possible publication.

Citation Style

JCLIS uses the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th Edition as the official citation style for manuscripts published by the journal. All manuscripts should employ the Notes and Bibliography style (as footnotes with a bibliography), and should conform to the guidelines as described in the Manual.

Submission Process

Manuscripts are to be submitted through JCLIS’ online submission system (http://libraryjuicepress.com/journals/index.php/jclis) by June 30th, 2018. This online submission process requires that manuscripts be submitted in separate stages in order to ensure the anonymity of the review process and to enable appropriate formatting.

Abstracts (500 words or less) should be submitted in plain text and should not include information identifying the author(s) or their institutional affiliations. With the exception of book reviews, an abstract must accompany all manuscript submissions before they are reviewed for publication.

The main text of the manuscript must be submitted as a stand-alone file (in Microsoft Word or RTF)) without a title page, abstract, page numbers, or other headers or footers. The title, abstract, and author information should be submitted through the submission platform.

October 13, 2017

NEW: Feminists Among Us: Resistance and Advocacy in Library Leadership

Feminists Among Us: Resistance and Advocacy in Library Leadership

Editors: Shirley Lew and Baharak Yousefi
Price: $22.00
Published: October 2017
ISBN: 978-1-63400-027-7

Number nine in the Litwin Books Series on Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies, Emily Drabinski, Series Editor

Feminists Among Us: Resistance and Advocacy in Library Leadership makes explicit the ways in which a grounding in feminist theory and practice impacts the work of library administrators who identify as feminists.

Recent scholarship by LIS researchers and practitioners on the intersections of gender with sexuality, race, class, and other social categories within libraries and other information environments have highlighted the need and desire of this community to engage with these concepts both in theory and praxis.

Feminists Among Us adds to this conversation by focusing on a subset of feminist LIS professionals and researchers in leadership roles who engage critically with both management work and librarianship. By collecting these often implicit professional acts, interactions, and dynamics and naming them as explicitly feminist, these accounts both document aspects of an existing community of practice as well as invite fellow feminists, advocates, and resisters to consider library leadership as a career path.

About the Editors

Shirley Lew is Dean, Library, Teaching & Learning Services at Vancouver Community College. She is Past-President of the BC Book Prizes, Director on the Vancouver Writers Fest Board, and an active member in professional and literary arts communities for fifteen years. She has a Bachelor of Arts in Human Geography and Master of Library and Information Studies.

Baharak Yousefi is Head of Library Communications at Simon Fraser University and a Director on the Board of the BC Libraries Cooperative. She received a Master of Arts in Women’s Studies in 2003 and a Master of Library and Information Studies in 2007. She lives on the unceded traditional lands of the Musqueam, Skwxwu7mesh, and Tsleil-Waututh people in Vancouver, BC.

This book is now available on Amazon.

NEW: The Feminist Reference Desk: Concepts, Critiques, and Conversations

The Feminist Reference Desk: Concepts, Critiques, and Conversations

Editor: Maria T. Accardi
Price: $35.00
Published: October 2017
ISBN: 978-1-63400-018-5

Number eight in the Litwin Books Series on Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies, Emily Drabinski, Series Editor

Feminist pedagogy employs strategies such as collaborative learning, valuing experiential knowledge, employing consciousness-raising about sexism and other forms of oppression, and destabilizing the power hierarchies of the traditional classroom. Ultimately, feminist library instruction seeks to empower learners to be both critical thinkers and critical actors who are motivated and prepared to bring about social change. The concept of feminist pedagogy has recently energized current conversations on library instruction, so it is fitting and timely to consider how feminism might intersect with another vital student-centered service the academic library provides: the reference desk. Inspired by the ideas, possibilities, and discussions set in motion by Maria T. Accardi’s Feminist Pedagogy for Library Instruction (2013), this edited collection continues these conversations by considering how feminist strategies and philosophies might reshape, invigorate, and critique approaches to reference services. In short, this collection will provide critical and thought-provoking explorations of how academic librarians might rethink central reference concepts and services, from the reference interview, to the reference collection, to the staffing of the reference desk itself, from a feminist perspective.

About the Editor: Maria T. Accardi is the author of Feminist Pedagogy for Library Instruction (2013), for which she received the 2014 ACRL WGSS Significant Achievement Award, and a co-editor of Critical Library Instruction: Theories and Methods (2010). She is Associate Librarian and Coordinator of Instruction and Reference at Indiana University Southeast in New Albany, Indiana.

This book is now Available on Amazon.

October 10, 2017

Newest classes at Library Juice Academy

Here are the newest classes that we have added to the Library Juice Academy lineup:

Introduction to Collection Development
Instructor: Robert Holley
Dates: January 8th to February 2nd, 2018

Dewey Decimal Classification
Instructor: Catelynne Sahadath
Dates: February 5th through March 2nd, 2018

Library of Congress Classification
Instructor: Catelynne Sahadath
Dates: April 2nd to 27th, 2018

Introduction to the Academic Publishing Industry
Instructor: Rolf Janke
Dates: March 5th through 30th, 2018

Foundations of Early Literacy: Using Your Knowledge to Enrich Library Experiences for Young Children and Their Families
Instructor: Saroj Ghoting
Dates: February 5th through March 2nd, 2018

Early Literacy-Enhanced Storytimes: Intentionality Is the Key
Instructor: Saroj Ghoting
Dates: March 5th through 30th, 2018

JSON-LD Fundamentals
Instructor: Robert Chavez
Dates: December 4th to 29th, 2017

October 3, 2017

CFP: Comics and Critical Librarianship for Academic Libraries

Call for chapter proposals

Note: This CFP has been updated, with a new deadline.
 
Working Title: Comics and Critical Librarianship for Academic Libraries
Editors: Olivia Miller & Stephanie Grimm
Submission Deadline: December 15, 2017
Publisher: Library Juice Press

Book description
This book will be a collection of chapters on ways comics have been used in the practice of critical librarianship. The intended audiences for this book are librarians and library workers that currently or hope to work with comics in academic libraries, people interested in critical librarianship, and comics scholars. The purpose of this book is to add to the conversation of critical librarianship within academic libraries by highlighting the use and focus of an already radical medium (comics) by librarians and library workers who practice critical librarianship.

For the purposes of this book, we use the term “comics” to mean any work in the medium of comics/sequential art. This can mean comic book issues, graphic novels, comic strips, webcomics, minicomics, etc.

We want both critical librarianship and comics to be approachable and accessible topics to our readers. One way we aim to do this is through approachable language much in the way that Maria T. Accardi did in Feminist Pedagogy for Library Instruction.
 
Possible topics
 
Possible topic areas include but are not limited to the following:
• Critical considerations of:
 o comics in academic library exhibitions or programming
 o comics in library instruction in higher education contexts
 o cataloging practices in relation to comics
 o acquisition or collection management/organization practices for comics and comics collections
 o comics or comics ephemera in special collections, archives, or manuscript collections
• Case studies on the critical use of comics in academic libraries and special collections
• Theoretical or research-based considerations of comics as a tool and site for critical librarianship
• Other relevant considerations of the topic 
Timeline
 
• Abstract submission deadline: December 15, 2017
• Notification/Feedback regarding submission: January 31, 2018
• First drafts due: June 15, 2018
• Final drafts due: October 15, 2018
• Final manuscript due to publisher: December 2018
 
Submissions
 
Please email abstracts of up to 500 words to critlibcomics (at) gmail (dot) com.
Abstracts should briefly describe your topic and how your chapter discusses using comics in critical librarianship. You are welcome to submit multiple abstracts about different possible topics. If your submission is tentatively accepted, the editors may request modifications. Material cannot be previously published.
 
Final chapters will be in the 2000-5000-word range. Abstracts that discuss comics being used in critical librarianship practices in tribal college libraries, HBCUs, Hispanic-serving institutions, community colleges, archives, special libraries, and libraries outside the United States are especially welcome.
 
Please direct any questions to Olivia Miller and Stephanie Grimm, editors, at critlibcomics (at) gmail (dot) com.
 
 
About the Editors
 
Olivia Miller (she/her) is the Arts & Humanities Librarian at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. Her BA is in Art History and English from the University of North Carolina Greensboro and she attended the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill for her MSLS. She built a strong graphic novel collection in her last position at Greensboro College and taught a for-credit course for two semesters on how to read and find comics with a feminist pedagogy.

Stephanie Grimm (she/her) is the Art and Art History Librarian at George Mason University in Fairfax, VA. She holds a BFA in Illustration and earned her MSI from the University of Michigan, where she developed a dedicated minicomics collection within the university libraries. She has worked with comics and illustration students at both art & design schools and research universities, and is a proponent of critical librarianship and literacy for artists and design students.

October 1, 2017

David Hudson Wins Fifth Annual Library Juice Paper Contest

David Hudson Wins Fifth Annual Library Juice Paper Contest

PRESS RELEASE
October 1, 2017
Sacramento, CA

Library Juice Press is happy to announce the winner of the Fifth Annual Library Juice Paper Contest. David James Hudson’s paper, titled, “On ‘Diversity’ as Anti-Racism in Library and Information Studies: A Critique,” published in the Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies, was judged by the award jury to be the best paper out of ten submitted in this year’s contest. The award jury consisted of three members who evaluated papers in a blind process. The jury wrote,

“On ‘Diversity’ as Anti-Racism in Library and Information Science Studies: A Critique” offers a nuanced and original engagement with the issue of persistent white supremacy in library and information science fields. Hudson positions the dominant professional discourse around diversity and inclusion as part of this intractable problem. The language of diversity, cultural competence, and privilege obscures the operation of racial power as a structural effect of white supremacy, limiting the field to approaches that address individual harms. Hudson embraces a broad interdisciplinary literature in order to make his claims, putting LIS in conversation with critical race, postcolonial, and feminist theories. In so doing, Hudson sharpens our vocabulary and deepens our thinking. His work challenges us to move beyond the “commodity solutions” [p. 25] of standards and toolkits to sustained critique that articulates and contests modes of power in LIS and the world in co-constructs.”

Mr. Hudson is Learning and Curriculum Support Librarian at the University of Guelph in Guelph, Ontario, Canada.

The award for honorable mention goes to Rafia Mirza and Maura Seale’s “Who Killed the World? White Masculinity and the Technocratic Library of the Future,” published in Topographies of Whiteness: Mapping Whiteness in Library and Information Science edited by Gina Schlesselman-Tarango (Library Juice Press, 2017).

The Library Juice Paper Contest winner receives an award of $1000. The intention of this contest is to encourage and reward good work in the field of library and information studies, humanistically understood, through a monetary award and public recognition. Papers submitted may be pending publication, or published (formally or informally) in the year of the award. Any type of paper may be entered as long as it is not a report of an empirical study. Examples of accepted forms would be literature review essays, analytical essays, historical research, and personal essays. The work may include some informal primary research, but may not essentially be the report of an empirical study.

The critera for judgment are:

– Clarity of writing
– Originality of thought
– Sincerity of effort at reaching something true
– Soundness of argumentation (where applicable)
– Relevance to our time and situation

Entries in next year’s award are due August 1st, 2018.

Library Juice Press is an imprint of Litwin Books, LLC specializing in theoretical and practical issues in librarianship from a critical perspective, for an audience of professional librarians and students of library science.

Media contact:
Rory Litwin
218-260-6115
rory@libraryjuicepress.com
PO Box 188784, Sacramento, CA 95818

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