August 31, 2017

CFP: GSISC18: Work

WORK: GSISC 18
#gsisc18

How do gender and sexuality WORK in library and information studies?

Gender and sexuality play various roles in the production, organization, dissemination, and consumption of information of all kinds. As categories of social identity, they do not act alone but in interaction and intersection with race, class, nation, language, ability and disability, and other social structures and systems. These intersections have been explored by information studies scholars, librarians, archivists, and other information sector workers in various contexts, including at two previous colloquia in Toronto (2014) and Vancouver (2016).

The planning committee for the 2018 Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies Colloquium invites you to continue these conversations July 20-21, 2018 in Boston, Massachusetts at Simmons College.

We invite submissions that address gender and sexuality and WORK: working it and doing the work, organized labor and emotional labor. The colloquium takes place in a moment of intensification both of various systems of oppression and resistance movements to them. As conservative national, state, and local politics and policies threaten healthcare and abortion rights, intensify the militarization of national borders, and attack organized labor from multiple directions, we are heartened by surges of organizing, activism, and direct action against them. In the information sector we see renewed focus on issues related to diversity and inclusion, open access and open collections, and critical approaches to everything from teaching to data management. Feminist and queer theory and practice are central to the work of making new and just worlds.

We are especially interested in submissions that link gender and sexuality to other, intersecting forms of difference. Potential topics might include:

– Gender, race, and class dimensions of “professionalism”
– Sex and sexuality in materials selection, organization, preservation, and access
– Intersections of social, political, and cultural organization with information organization
– Information practices of diversity, equity, and inclusion
– The work of the “normal” in information studies and practice
– Labor organizing in information workplaces
– The ways that gendered or feminized labor is and is not documented in the historical record
– “Resistance” as a mode of information work
– Ability and disability as structuring forces in libraries and archives
– How information workers inhabit, deploy, restrict, and manifest as bodies at work
– Eroding distinctions between work and leisure
– Distinctions between embodied, emotional, intellectual information work
– Contingent and precarious labor in the information workplace
– Ethics of care and empathy in information work
– Masculinity and power in libraries and archives
– Desire in the library and archive

We invite submissions from individuals as well as pre-constituted panels. Submit your proposals here: https://bit.ly/GSISC18

Deadline for submission: December 1, 2017
Notification by February 1, 2018
Registration opens February 15, 2018

Please direct any questions or concerns to Emily Drabinski at emily.drabinski@gmail.com

August 26, 2017

Recording of webinar on working with LJP

We ran a webinar yesterday titled “Working with Library Juice Press: An Orientation.” It was recorded, and the recording is available here.

Here’s the description of the webinar:

This free webinar will provide an overview of the processes involved in having a book published with Library Juice Press or Litwin Books. Topics covered will include types of books we publish, submitting a proposal, working with your editor, creating a quality manuscript, and an overview and timeline of the publishing process. The intended audience is anyone curious about our publishing process, particularly those who are potentially interested in submitting a book proposal to us. Authors and editors who currently have a book contract with us may also wish to attend. The presentation will last approximately 45 minutes, with 10-15 minutes for questions afterwards.

August 16, 2017

New additions to the Library Juice Academy lineup

Here are some classes that we have added recently to the Library Juice Academy lineup:

Controlled Vocabulary and Taxonomy Design
Instructor: Jillian Wallis
Dates: September 5th to 30th, 2017

Introducing BIBFRAME: Moving Bibliographic Data into the Future
Instructor: Rebecca Guenther
Dates: October 2nd to 27th, 2017

Humanities Librarianship in a Digital Age
Instructor: John Russell
Dates: October 2nd to 27th, 2017

Supercharging Your Storytimes: Using Interactivity, Intentionality, and Community of Practice to Help Children Learn with Joy
Instructor: Saroj Ghoting
Dates: October 2nd to 27th, 2017

Working with Library Service Design Tools
Instructor: Joe J. Marquez
Dates: October 2nd to 27th, 2017

Introduction to Design Thinking
Instructor: Carli Spina
Dates: November 6th through December 1st, 2017

Introduction to JSON and Structured Data
Instructor: Robert Chavez
Dates: October 2nd to 27th, 2017

Exploring Librarianship through Critical Reflection
Instructor: Rick Stoddart
Dates: November 6th through December 1st, 2017

Introduction to Web Traffic Assessment Using Google Analytics
Instructor: Lisa Gayhart
Dates: January 8th to February 2nd, 2018

Web Accessibility: Techniques for Design and Testing
Instructor: Carli Spina
Dates: February 5th through March 2nd, 2018

August 4, 2017

CFP: 2017 OK-ACRL Conference: “Critical Librarianship” theme

Dear colleagues-

Information is not neutral. The concept of “authority” includes innate bias toward people with privilege. The cultural, socioeconomic, and racial backgrounds of students have an effect on the way they seek information. Access to information is a human rights issue.

These are all examples of ideas that fall under the umbrella of “Critical Librarianship.” (http://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/keeping_up_with/critlib) How are you applying these ideas in your library? Where do you see a need for critlib at your institution? How can we serve our students more equitably? How can we increase diversity within the profession?

Brainstorm and submit a proposal to present at the 2017 OK-ACRL Conference. Proposals are due October 6th and presenters will be notified of acceptance by October 20th. Please contact Karl Siewert at siewert@nsuok.edu with any questions. The conference will be held on the Oklahoma State University Tulsa campus on November 10, 2017.


Karl G. Siewert, MLIS
Instructor and Reference Librarian – NSU-BA
Tulsa, OK