July 23, 2017

CFP: Ethical Questions in Name Authority Control

Call for chapter proposals
Working Title: Ethical Questions in Name Authority Control
Editor: Jane Sandberg
Submission Deadline: October 20, 2017
Publisher: Library Juice Press

Book description
Catalogers hold very specific types of power when they describe people, families, and corporate bodies. When creating a personal name authority record, for example, catalogers determine the authorized name by which an individual will be known, then identify a few characteristics of the individual that distinguish them from others, while balancing their judgment with respect for the individual’s self-concept. This is a powerful position, and that power must be exercised ethically.

As name authority control moves toward an identity management model, catalogers are taking on new roles, authority data is used in innovative ways, and libraries increasingly interact with non-library datasets and name disambiguation algorithms. During this transition, it is imperative that the library community reflect on the ethical questions that arise from its historical and emerging practices.

The present volume raises many of these questions in the hope of building toward a framework for the ethical practice of name authority control. This framework would include — at minimum — the following concepts:
* Respect for the people described in authority systems, including deceased people
* Fulfillment of name authority control objectives for names from a variety of cultural naming traditions and personal histories
* Local community needs
* Acknowledgment of historical and contemporary injustices
* Consideration of potential future uses of authority data
* Ethical employment practices

This collection will explore and develop this framework through theoretical and practice-based essays, stories, content analyses, and other methods. As it explores ethical questions in a variety of settings, this book will deepen readers’ understanding of names, identities, and library catalogs. The chapters from this volume are intended to spark conversations among librarians, archivists, library technologists, library administrators, and library and information science students.

Possible topics
Possible topics include but are not limited to the following:
* Ethical dimensions of an identity management approach to authority control (e.g. how should catalogers approach linking to flawed name authority data?)
* Responses to the PCC Ad Hoc Task Group on Gender in Name Authority Records recommendations
* Representations of people with Arabic, CJK, and Indigenous names in Google Scholar, ISNI, ORCID, Scopus, and online repositories
* Applying contemporary gender and demographic terms to non-contemporary people
* Describing people using demographic terms taken from thesauri other than LCSH or LC Demographic Group Terms (e.g. First Nations House of Learning thesaurus, Homosaurus)
* Barriers (technological, structural, etc.) to ethical name authority control
* Assumptions and flaws in name disambiguation and clustering algorithms
* Author privacy concerns
* Online name authority files in the context of right-to-be-forgotten laws
* Decolonizing name authority files
* Ethical dimensions of corporate and family name authority control
* Creating authority data in conjunction with the people and groups they describe
* Emotional labor in name authority work
* Connections between hiring and employment practices and name authority work
* Ethical name authority questions in consortial environments
* Effective advocacy for ethical name authority control and identity management practices

Timeline
Abstract submission deadline: October 20, 2017
Notification/Feedback regarding submission: December 1, 2017
First drafts due: April 13, 2018
Final drafts due: June 8, 2018
Final manuscript due to publisher: July, 2018

Submissions
Please email abstracts of up to 500 words to sandbej [at] linnbenton [dot] edu.

Abstracts should briefly describe your topic and how your chapter will help to build a framework of ethical name authority control practice. You are welcome to submit multiple abstracts about different possible topics. If your submission is tentatively accepted, the editor may request modifications. Material cannot be previously published.

Final chapters will be in the 2000-5000 word range. The volume will contain perspectives from a range of NACO and non-NACO libraries. Abstracts that explore the ethical dimensions of name authority work in tribal libraries, HBCUs, Hispanic-serving institutions, community colleges, public libraries, archives, school libraries, special libraries, and libraries outside the United States are particularly encouraged.

Please direct any questions to Jane Sandberg (sandbej [at] linnbenton [dot] edu).

About the Editor
Jane Sandberg received her MLIS from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is the Electronic Resources Librarian at Linn-Benton Community College in Albany, Oregon, where she coordinates library cataloging and systems. Her research interests include linked data approaches to name authority control, queer and trans local histories, open source software in rural communities, and historical dimensions of online transgender activism.

Webinar: Working with Library Juice Press: An Orientation

Working with Library Juice Press: An Orientation

Presenter: Alison M. Lewis, Library Juice Press

This free webinar will provide an overview of the processes involved in having a book published with Library Juice Press or Litwin Books. Topics covered will include types of books we publish, submitting a proposal, working with your editor, creating a quality manuscript, and an overview and timeline of the publishing process. The intended audience is anyone curious about our publishing process, particularly those who are potentially interested in submitting a book proposal to us. Authors and editors who currently have a book contract with us may also wish to attend. The presentation will last approximately 45 minutes, with 10-15 minutes for questions afterwards.

August 25th, 1pm EDT. One hour duration.

No prior registration is necessary. Just go here at the meeting time:
https://libraryjuice.adobeconnect.com/working-with-ljp/

July 19, 2017

JCLIS Vol 1, No 2 (2017): Critical Archival Studies

Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies

Vol 1, No 2 (2017): Critical Archival Studies
Guest Editors: Michelle Caswell, Ricardo Punzalan, and T-Kay Sangwand

Table of Contents

Editors’ Note

Critical Archival Studies: An Introduction
Michelle Caswell, Ricardo Punzalan, T-Kay Sangwand

Articles

A Matter of Life or Death: A Critical Examination of the Role of Records and Archives in Supporting the Agency of the Forcibly Displaced
Anne J. Gilliland

Critical Archiving and Recordkeeping Research and Practice in the Continuum
Joanne Evans, Sue McKemmish, Greg Rolan

Archives Without Archives: (Re)Locating and (Re)Defining the Archive Through Post-Custodial Praxis
Christian Kelleher

Archival Amnesty: In Search of Black American Transitional and Restorative Justice
Tonia Sutherland

Power to the People: Documenting Police Violence in Cleveland
Stacie M Williams, Jarrett Drake

Appraising Newness: Whiteness, Neoliberalism & the Building of the Archive for New Poetry
Eunsong Kim

Insistering Derrida: Cixous, Deconstruction, and the Work of Archive
Verne Harris

Critical Feminism in the Archives
Marika Cifor, Stacy Wood

A Queer/ed Archival Methodology: Archival Bodies as Nomadic Subjects
Jamie Ann Lee

ISSN: 2572-1364

July 9, 2017

New book: Queer Library Alliance: Global Reflections and Imaginings

Queer Library Alliance: Global Reflections and Imaginings

Editors: Rae-Anne Montague and Lucas McKeever
Price: $35.00
Published: July 2017
ISBN: 978-1-63400-031-4
282 pages

Available on Amazon.

Queer identities are complex. They are embedded in a web of intersectionality and often challenging to fully define. Sometimes queerness shines like a beacon and this radiance is captured in media. Sometimes it is more subtle. Often it is invisible. Promoting understanding and visibility are primary goals of this anthology. As library professionals that create, utilize, and make accessible systems of organization and classification for information, intersectionality must remain a clear objective in addressing these historical absences. These topics represent some of our efforts to respond to challenges, address critical needs, and serve as essential forces against systematic oppression across service areas, library types, and borders. The first section of this collection of essays looks at how we are developing understanding and library services that reflect and are responsive to LGBTQ user needs. The second emphasizes opportunities and approaches for augmenting queer professional practice, which ultimately benefits our diverse library users. Contributors hail from, reside in, and study issues from several countries around the world including Canada, Democratic Republic of Congo, England, India, Japan, Sweden, and the U.S.A. With many areas of the world not represented in this text, we recognize biases inherent in our perspectives. As librarians, archivists, and other information professionals committed to facilitating access and high-quality services for LGBTQ- and other marginalized users, it is important to stress that this is just one step in a larger process. There is still much more to consider and do as we continue to advocate for equity in library services to all.

Rae-Anne Montague is Director of Outreach Programs at Hawai’i Pacific University and affiliate faculty at the University of Hawai’i at M?noa Library and Information Science Program. Her interests include community engagement, inquiry, and social justice. She has developed and provided leadership for several LIS initiatives including WISE (Web-based Information Science Education) and LAMP (LIS Access Midwest Program). She is currently working with E Noelo I Ka ‘Ike (To Search for Knowledge), a project designed to increase awareness and understanding of Hawaiian resource materials.

Lucas McKeever is the Head of Technical Services at Elmwood Park Public Library near Chicago, Illinois. Since 2013, he has been an active coordinator of the LGBTQ Users Special Interest Group of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA). Additionally, he has served on the Rainbow Book List Committee of the GLBT Round Table of the American Library Association and has been named an American Library Association Emerging Leader. Previously, Lucas was the director of the Gerber/Hart Library and Archives, an organization committed to documenting and preserving facets of LGBTQ life in the Midwestern United States.

July 5, 2017

Timothy Gorichanaz wins the 2017 Litwin Books Award for Ongoing Dissertation Research

Press release
7/5/2017
Media contact:
Rory Litwin, rory@litwinbooks.com

We are pleased to announce the winner of the 2017 Litwin Books Award for Ongoing Dissertation Research in the Philosophy of Information. We are granting this year’s award to Timothy John Gorichanaz of Drexel University, based on his dissertation project, “Understanding Self-Documentation.” In this work, Gorichanaz seeks to better understand our current obsession with self-documentation – pictorial documentation in particular (e.g., the “selfie”) – through a study of the popular artistic practice of self-portraiture from the point of view of document theory and the philosophy of information.

A member of the award committee says, “Gorichanaz shows a wide-ranging knowledge of the relevant work in philosophy and information science, displaying an ability to make novel and insightful connections amongst a broad range of theorists. On this base he builds a set of well-crafted and fascinating research questions about the nature of the self-portrait as a document and as a form of experiential understanding.” The committee is confident that this dissertation will be a valuable contribution to the areas that Gorichanaz identifies in his proposal: document theory, information behavior, the philosophy of information and critical discourse within information science.

The award consists of a certificate suitable for framing and $1000 check.

Since this award is for ongoing research, other applicants who are still working on their dissertations will be eligible to enter their work next year, and we strongly encourage them to do so.

For more information about the award, please visit http://litwinbooks.com/award.php.

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July 2, 2017

Library Juice Grants and Awards

The Library Juice Press Annual Paper Contest
Rewarding good work in the field of library and information studies, humanistically understood, through a monetary award and public recognition. Criteria for judgment are clarity of writing; originality of thought; sincerity of effort at reaching something true; soundness of argumentation (where applicable); and relevance to our time and situation.

The Litwin Books Award for Ongoing Doctoral Dissertation Research in the Philosophy of Information
An award that consists of $1,000, given annually to a graduate student who is working on a dissertation on the philosophy of information (broadly construed). As we see it, the range of philosophical questions relating to information is broad, and approachable through a variety of philosophical traditions (philosophy of mind, logic, philosophy of information so-called, philosophy of science, etc.).

The Litwin Books Travel Grant
Litwin Books provides financial support to scholars in LIS and related fields for travel to conferences they attend, domestically or internationally. Travel grants are limited to $500 for domestic conferences and $1000 for travel to a conference outside the recipient’s home country.

The ACRL ULS Outstanding Professional Development Award
Sponsored by Library Juice Academy, this award is intended to recognize librarians, archivists or curators whose contributions to providing professional development opportunities for librarians have been especially noteworthy or influential. The effect of these contributions may be the result of continuous or distinguished service to the profession, but may also be the result of extraordinarily active, innovative or collaborative work that deserves national recognition.

The Library Juice + DLF Forum Fellowship
This is a fellowship and travel award meant to support one mid-career professional in digital libraries and related fields. These fellowships are designed to offset travel and lodging expenses associated with attending the Forum. Library Juice+DLF Forum fellows additionally receive complimentary full registration to the Forum (up to a $750 value) and an invitation to special networking events.