October 11, 2016

CFP: Urban Library Journal

Call for Papers

Urban Library Journal (ULJ) is an open access, double-blind peer-reviewed journal of research that addresses all aspects of urban libraries and librarianship.

Urban Library Journal invites submissions in broad areas such as public higher education, urban studies, multiculturalism, library and educational services to immigrants, preservation of public higher education, and universal access to World Wide Web resources. We welcome articles that focus on all forms of librarianship in an urban setting, whether that setting is an academic, research, public, school, or special library.

Possible topics may include, but are not limited to:

– Reference and instruction in diverse, multicultural urban settings
– Radical librarianship, social justice issues, and/or informed agitation
– Intentional design / “library as space” in an urban setting
– Physical and/or virtual accessibility issues
– Open education resources in urban systems
– Innovative collaboration between academic departments, other branches, or community partnerships

More!

Completed manuscript length should fall between 2,500 and 5,000 words. Full author guidelines can be found on the ULJ website: http://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/author_guidelines.html

The submission period is open now and closes on January 1st, 2017.

For more information about ULJ and to see the latest issue: http://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj.

Some supplemental readings on #critlib history

Tonight’s #critlib discussion is about the “history of critical librarianship.” The moderators give some suggested readings and additional ones for further exploration, a couple of which I would not have thought of. There is a lot out there that relates to the history of critical librarianship. I’ve just gone over to my collection and pulled out a few things I want to add to the list of books for “further exploration.” First I’ll copy the ones the moderators suggest, so that they will be stick with my suggestions here:

Suggested readings:

Morrone, M., & Friedman, L. (2009). Radical reference : socially responsible librarianship collaborating with community. The Reference Librarian, 50(4).

Harger, E. (2016). Which Side Are You On? : Seven Social Responsibility Debates in American Librarianship, 1990–2015. (especially the Introduction and chapter 1)

For further exploration:

Pettigrew, K., Fidel, R., & Bruce, H. (2001). Conceptual frameworks in information behaviour. Annual Review of Information Science and Technology, 35, 43–78.

Pettigrew, K., & McKechnie, L. (2001). The use of theory in information science research. Journal of the Association of Information Science and Technology, 52(1), 62–73.

Kagan, A. (2015). Progressive Library Organizations: A Worldwide History.

Samek, T. (2001). Intellectual Freedom and Social Responsibility in American Librarianship, 1967-1974.

Here are the readings I suggest in addition. These include studies of critical librarianship historically and memoirs and biographies of people involved in it, but mostly classic examples of critical writing in librarianship from the 60s, 70s, and 80s. They are in no particular order. It’s not an exhaustive list by any means, just a short list I compiled by going over to my bookshelves.

Bundy, M. L, & Stielow, F. J. (1987). Activism in American Librarianship, 1962-1973.

Schuman, P. G. (1976). Social Responsibilities and Libraries: A Library Journal/School Library Journal Selection.

Peattie, N. (1989). A Passage for Dissent: The Best of Sipapu, 1970-1988.

West, C. & Katz, E. (1972). Revolting Librarians.

Berman, S. (1971, 1993). Prejudices and Antipathies: A Tract of LC Subject Headings Concerning People.

Berman, S. & Danky, J. (1982/1983-2000/2001). Alternative Library Literature: A Biennial Anthology.

Horn, Z. (1995). Zoia! Memoirs of Zoia Horn, Battler for the People’s Right to Know.

Kister, K. F. (2002). Eric Moon: The Life and Library Times.

Progressive Librarian (1990-present).