October 21, 2016

CFP: Information Ethics Roundtable 2017

Call for Proposals

Data & Ethics

Information Ethics Roundtable 2017
April 21-22

Proposals Due: January 2, 2017
Notification of Acceptance: January 30, 2017

https://ier2017.wordpress.com

In our knowledge society, our networked selves continually create and are created through data. In light of the ubiquity of data in the contemporary world, the ethical creation, dissemination, use, and storage of data continues to be an area of concern. The focus of the 2017 roundtable will be on all aspects of data (writ large) and ethics.

The Information Ethics Roundtable is a yearly conference which brings together researchers from disciplines such as philosophy, information science, communications, public administration, anthropology and law to discuss ethical issues such as information privacy, intellectual property, intellectual freedom, and censorship.

Suggested areas of inquiry include, but are not limited to:
• The primacy of data over the individual
• Reinforcement of personal preferences through surveillance of personal data
• Responsibilities and ethical obligations for data curation and sharing
• Privacy and surveillance (including the NSA disclosures)
• “Big Data” research and the ethical treatment of human subjects
• Moral implications of the Quantified Self
• Ethics in data science instruction/pedagogy
• Social justice and data collection

We invite both individual and group proposals:

(1) For individual paper proposals, please submit a 500-word abstract of your paper.

(2) For panel, fishbowl, or group proposals, please identify participants with a 100-250 word biography and submit a 1500 word abstract of your topic and treatment.

Proposals should be sent to ier2017-ischool@illinois.edu.

Deadline for Proposals: January 2nd, 2017

Notification of Acceptance: Monday, January 30, 2017

Conference Dates: April 21-22, 2016

Conference Organizing Committee:

Emily J.M. Knox, Assistant Professor, University of Illinois
Emily Lawrence, Doctoral Student, University of Illinois
Shannon M. Oltmann, Assistant Professor, University of Kentucky
Allen Renear, Dean and Professor, University of Illinois

Sponsors:

School of Information Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign
Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities

University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Department of Philosophy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Illinois Informatics Institute

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October 14, 2016

Seeking helper(s) for ALA Midwinter in Atlanta

Library Juice Press and Library Juice Academy are looking for someone, or maybe a couple of people, to help us out with our presence in the exhibits hall during ALA Midwinter in Atlanta, January 20th to 23rd. Compensation is $20/hr, with likely 20 hours of work over the four days (flexible). Transportation to Atlanta and lodging are your responsibility. The primary responsibility is to talk to attendees of the conference about our books and online classes. The main qualification is familiarity with our work. Please send a cover letter and resume to Rory Litwin, at rory@libraryjuicepress.com.

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October 11, 2016

CFP: Urban Library Journal

Call for Papers

Urban Library Journal (ULJ) is an open access, double-blind peer-reviewed journal of research that addresses all aspects of urban libraries and librarianship.

Urban Library Journal invites submissions in broad areas such as public higher education, urban studies, multiculturalism, library and educational services to immigrants, preservation of public higher education, and universal access to World Wide Web resources. We welcome articles that focus on all forms of librarianship in an urban setting, whether that setting is an academic, research, public, school, or special library.

Possible topics may include, but are not limited to:

– Reference and instruction in diverse, multicultural urban settings
– Radical librarianship, social justice issues, and/or informed agitation
– Intentional design / “library as space” in an urban setting
– Physical and/or virtual accessibility issues
– Open education resources in urban systems
– Innovative collaboration between academic departments, other branches, or community partnerships

More!

Completed manuscript length should fall between 2,500 and 5,000 words. Full author guidelines can be found on the ULJ website: http://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/author_guidelines.html

The submission period is open now and closes on January 1st, 2017.

For more information about ULJ and to see the latest issue: http://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj.

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Some supplemental readings on #critlib history

Tonight’s #critlib discussion is about the “history of critical librarianship.” The moderators give some suggested readings and additional ones for further exploration, a couple of which I would not have thought of. There is a lot out there that relates to the history of critical librarianship. I’ve just gone over to my collection and pulled out a few things I want to add to the list of books for “further exploration.” First I’ll copy the ones the moderators suggest, so that they will be stick with my suggestions here:

Suggested readings:

Morrone, M., & Friedman, L. (2009). Radical reference : socially responsible librarianship collaborating with community. The Reference Librarian, 50(4).

Harger, E. (2016). Which Side Are You On? : Seven Social Responsibility Debates in American Librarianship, 1990–2015. (especially the Introduction and chapter 1)

For further exploration:

Pettigrew, K., Fidel, R., & Bruce, H. (2001). Conceptual frameworks in information behaviour. Annual Review of Information Science and Technology, 35, 43–78.

Pettigrew, K., & McKechnie, L. (2001). The use of theory in information science research. Journal of the Association of Information Science and Technology, 52(1), 62–73.

Kagan, A. (2015). Progressive Library Organizations: A Worldwide History.

Samek, T. (2001). Intellectual Freedom and Social Responsibility in American Librarianship, 1967-1974.

Here are the readings I suggest in addition. These include studies of critical librarianship historically and memoirs and biographies of people involved in it, but mostly classic examples of critical writing in librarianship from the 60s, 70s, and 80s. They are in no particular order. It’s not an exhaustive list by any means, just a short list I compiled by going over to my bookshelves.

Bundy, M. L, & Stielow, F. J. (1987). Activism in American Librarianship, 1962-1973.

Schuman, P. G. (1976). Social Responsibilities and Libraries: A Library Journal/School Library Journal Selection.

Peattie, N. (1989). A Passage for Dissent: The Best of Sipapu, 1970-1988.

West, C. & Katz, E. (1972). Revolting Librarians.

Berman, S. (1971, 1993). Prejudices and Antipathies: A Tract of LC Subject Headings Concerning People.

Berman, S. & Danky, J. (1982/1983-2000/2001). Alternative Library Literature: A Biennial Anthology.

Horn, Z. (1995). Zoia! Memoirs of Zoia Horn, Battler for the People’s Right to Know.

Kister, K. F. (2002). Eric Moon: The Life and Library Times.

Progressive Librarian (1990-present).

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October 1, 2016

Lisa Sloniowski wins Fourth Annual Library Juice Paper Contest

PRESS RELEASE
October 1, 2016
Sacramento, CA

Library Juice Press is happy to announce the winner of the Fourth Annual Library Juice Paper Contest. Lisa Sloniowski’s paper, titled, “Affective Labor, Resistance, and the Academic Librarian,” published in Library Trends, was judged by the award jury to be the best paper out of 19 submitted in this year’s contest. The award jury consisted of three members and evaluated papers in a blind process. The jury wrote,

“‘Affective Labor, Resistance and the Academic Librarian’ extends the traditional analysis of librarianship as a feminized profession by drawing on Marxist and Autonomist conceptions of labor to make an important and urgent argument for the role of affective labor in librarianship generally, and reference and liaison librarianship specifically. This immaterial, affective work is increasingly subject to post-Fordist metrics that devalue or disregard the emotional and intellectual subtleties underpinning the work of librarians; baked into the long conversations with students and faculty who may “leave [our] office[s] in tears” (647); or the nuance and care required to develop and curate an intellectually honest research collection. Underscoring the value of librarianship in the digital age and in the context of the neoliberal university we are reminded that we need be mindful of the decisions we make as we move forward as stewards of libraries and librarianship and offered potential modes of resistance.”

Ms. Sloniowski is Associate Librarian at York University in Toronto.

The award for honorable mention goes to Anne Gilliland and Michelle Caswell’s “Records and Their Imaginaries: Imagining the Impossible, Making Possible the Imagined,” published in Archival Science.

The Library Juice Paper Contest winner receives an award of $1000. The intention of this contest is to encourage and reward good work in the field of library and information studies, humanistically understood, through a monetary award and public recognition. Papers submitted may be pending publication, or published (formally or informally) in the year of the award. Any type of paper may be entered as long as it is not a report of an empirical study. Examples of accepted forms would be literature review essays, analytical essays, historical papers, and personal essays. The work may include some informal primary research, but may not essentially be the report of an empirical study.

The critera for judgment are:

– Clarity of writing
– Originality of thought
– Sincerity of effort at reaching something true
– Soundness of argumentation (where applicable)
– Relevance to our time and situation

Entries in next year’s award are due August 1st, 2017.

Library Juice Press is an imprint of Litwin Books, LLC specializing in theoretical and practical issues in librarianship from a critical perspective, for an audience of professional librarians and students of library science.

Media contact:
Rory Litwin
218-260-6115
rory@libraryjuicepress.com
PO Box 188784, Sacramento, CA 95818

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