September 24, 2016

Travel grant opportunity – Deadline November 1st

Litwin Books provides financial support to scholars in LIS and related fields for travel to conferences they attend, domestically or internationally. Travel grants are limited to $500 for domestic conferences and $1000 for travel to a conference outside the recipient’s home country. No more than one grant is available per recipient per year, and grants over the course of the year are limited to available funds.

Applications should include a CV, the accepted abstract for the presentation, or the paper itself if available, as well as any information about the conference that may be helpful. Evaluation will be based in part on the paper’s “fit” with the publishing program of Litwin Books and its associated imprints. Applications are evaluated by a panel of three judges.

Except in unusual circumstances, funds will be a reimbursement of travel and lodging expenses up to the award amount, based on documentation of the expense and evidence that you participated in the conference (nametag, program, tweets, etc.)

Applications may be sent to inquiries@litwinbooks.com by November 1st of each year. Recipients of the travel grant will be notified on December 1st.

We ask that you acknowledge the travel grant in your presentation and on your CV.

Past Recipients

Natalie Baur, to travel from Mexico City to Portland, Oregon, as co-organizer of a one-day forum on community archives during the Society of American Archivists meeting in 2017. $1000

Jamila Ghaddar, to participate in a panel titled, “Archival interventions: Anti-violence and social justice work in community contexts,” at the Association for Information Science and Technology Annual Meeting in Copenhagen, Denmark in 2016. $500

Nathaniel Moore, to present his paper, “Speaking Truth to Power: Archives, Community Engagement and Advocacy,” at the Northwest Archivist Annual Conference in Denver in 2016. $500

Jen LaBarbera, to present her paper, “History in the Making: How Archives and Activists Can Work Together,” at the Gender & Sexuality in Information Studies Colloquium in 2016. $500

Marika L. Cifor, to present her paper, “Blood, Sweat, and Hair: The Archival Potential of Queer and Trans Bodies,” at the Gender & Sexuality in Information Studies Colloquium in 2016. $500

Julie Winkelstein, to present her paper, “Safe in the Stacks: Public Libraries Serving LGBTQ Homeless Youth,” at the Public Library Association Annual Conference in 2016. $500

Nathaniel Enright, to present his paper, “The Austerity of Literacy: The Financialization of Information and the Politics of Debt,” at the Canadian Association of Professional Academic Librarians in 2015. $1000

Anna Wilson, to present her paper, “Comparing Indigenous Approaches to Autism with Western Approaches to Autism,” at the Canadian Association of Professional Academic Librarians in 2015. $500

September 20, 2016

ODLOS launches Intersections, calls for contributors

CHICAGO – The ALA Office for Diversity, Literacy, and Outreach Services (ODLOS)is launching Intersections, a new blog that highlights the everyday work of library and information science workers as they advocate for equity and inclusion as they relate to diversity, literacy and access among membership, the field of librarianship and the communities they serve.

The blog invites submissions from across the library profession that feature support for those from historically and disadvantaged racial and ethnic groups; those who experience socioeconomic barriers, people experiencing hunger, homelessness and poverty; immigrants, refugees and new Americans; those discriminated against based on nationality or language; those who are geographically isolated; those experiencing barriers in regards to access to literacy; and new and non-readers.

“We envision Intersections to be a vibrant and thriving place for our members to share their stories,” said ODLOS Director Jody Gray. “We’ll also be sharing exciting news from ODLOS and our many constituencies, including information on conferences, initiatives, grants, and much more.”

For more information, including submission information, please visit www.ala.org/intersections.

The ALA Office for Diversity, Literacy, and Outreach Services supports library and information science workers in creating safe, responsible, and all-inclusive spaces that serve and represent the entire community. To accomplish this, we decenter power and privilege by facilitating conversations around access and identity as they impact the profession and those we serve. We use a social justice framework to inform library and information science workers’ development of resources. We strive to create an association culture where these concerns are incorporated into everybody’s everyday work.

###

CONTACT:

John L. Amundsen, MLIS
Program Officer, Outreach and Communications
Office for Diversity, Literacy, and Outreach Services
American Library Association
50 East Huron Street
Chicago, IL 60611
T 312.280.2140 | F 312.280.3256
jamundsen@ala.org | www.ala.org/diversity

September 16, 2016

Call for book reviewers for Progressive Librarian

Message from Michael Matthews, Progressive Librarian Book Review Editor:

Dear Progressive Library Workers:

Do you like balmy summer late afternoons, listening to the crickets chirp as you paddle a canoe along a mountain stream while watching a mother moose and her adorable calf drink clear, unpolluted water as an eagle swoops down, clutching a PCB-free trout in in its talons?

Because if you do, I would stop reading this message now and book your vacation plans for Never-Never Land. I’m looking for book reviewers for Progressive Librarian #46 as well as for recently published titles in the following fields of interest:

LGBT, queer, and feminist perspectives on library work
Late (neoliberal) capitalism and the politics of information
Libraries, neoliberal ideology, and social reproduction
Poverty, homelessness, and the role of libraries (in either mitigating the circumstances of poverty or exacerbating them)
Libraries, information technology, and the proletarianization of library workers
Climate change, the Anthropocene, and the challenge for libraries in the Age of the (not-so-immediate) Sixth Extinction
Library management discourse, the future of libraries, and performativity
Scholarly communication and the role of libraries in supporting the supremacy of publishers—or their possible role in subverting them

And…as Ron Popeil would say, “much, much more!” If you can find a book that fits these criteria or might even share a shaded portion of the circle within a Venn diagram, then please forward it to my attention. And if you would like to review such a book (or another book, which I may forward to your attention) then so much the better!

We will also entertain reviews of books (or other works) that cleverly torpedo the pretensions of our profession’s self-appointed “thought leaders”, and pitilessly reduce their arguments to a burning pile of wreckage—with eloquence, wit, and substantive scholarship, of course.

Your friendly neighborhood book editor, social raconteur, and mad gadabout,
Michael Matthews
_________________________________
Michael Matthews
Head of Serials & Media/
Associate Professor of Library Science
Northwestern State University Libraries
Natchitoches, Louisiana 71497
matthewsm@nsula.edu
318-357-4419

September 1, 2016

The Mortenson Center Launches Libraries for Peace Initiative

From: Clara Chu to multiple lists
Subject: The Mortenson Center Launches Libraries for Peace Initiative

[please forward as appropriate]

The Mortenson Center warmly invites libraries and librarians around the world to take part in our International Peace Day initiative. Visit our website (librariesforpeace.org) to learn about what libraries are doing to promote peace, how they can initiate their own efforts, and where these actions are taking place; to discuss and share ideas of libraries and peacebuilding; and to serve as an information hub for an international library celebration and action day for peace.

JOIN this Libraries for Peace (L4P) movement by going to the website to:

1. Celebrate Library for Peace (L4P) Day on 21st September, 2016 (International Day of Peace)
2. Pledge to advance the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals
3. Share your story of how you and/or your library are working toward building a peaceful and sustainable local and global community.

The Libraries for Peace web portal was created to advance the mission of the Mortenson Center for International Library Programs, which for the past 25 years, has worked to strengthen international ties among libraries and librarians worldwide for the promotion of international education, understanding, and peace. Libraries as information, education and cultural centers have a role in advancing peace internationally.

For more information, please email mortenson@illinois.edu

Clara M. Chu
Director and Mortenson Distinguished Professor
Mortenson Center for International Library Programs
142 Undergraduate Library, MC-522
1402 W. Gregory Dr.
Urbana, IL 61801 USA
Email: cmchu@illinois.edu Phone: (217) 300-0918
http://www.library.illinois.edu/mortenson ~ phone: (217) 333-3085