June 29, 2016

CFP: Human Operators: A Critical Oral History of Technology in Libraries

About the book

Human Operators: A Critical Oral History of Technology in Libraries will be a collective oral history covering many of the issues in technology in librarianship in the early 21st century. Via edited and compiled interview transcripts, readers will get to “hear” the voices of librarians and archivists discussing tech topics from perspectives that are critical, social justice-oriented, feminist, anti-racist, and ecologically-minded.

Objective

This readable, conversational book will bring out specific critiques of technology as well as more inspiring aspects of what’s going on in the instructional, open source, free culture, and maker worlds in the field. The book will be less about the technology per se and more about critical thinking around technology and how it actually works in people’s lives.

The stories that this book intends to capture may have been documented in blog posts, Twitter conversations, and academic articles, but this “oral history” will be an opportunity for them to live on in printed book form.

Target audiences

– Librarians and archivists who want to hear about use cases, organizational impacts, and generally how people (staff and library users alike) are affected by technology in libraries.
– Technologists who want to better understand how ideas are sparked, decisions are made, and hardware and software are deployed in libraries.
– Other readers who think about technology and society.

About the editor

Melissa Morrone is a librarian at Brooklyn Public Library and manages the Shelby White and Leon Levy Information Commons there. She is a non-technologist who has long been involved in technology (writing CMS documentation; developing and conducting training on her organization’s ILS, Internet filters, and digital privacy; giving online research workshops for activists; doing everyday public library reference and computer support) at work and elsewhere.

How to participate

Email informed.agitation@gmail.com by July 31, 2016, if you’re interested in setting up an online interview to discuss your work around one or more of the following topics:

– open source ILSs and other FOSS software
– library cataloging and automation
– ebooks, DRM, and related issues
– makerspaces and digital media labs
– privacy, security, and surveillance
– technology instruction and digital literacy
– digital humanities
– digital archives
– digital reader’s advisory
– continuing education, conference codes of conduct, and other professional activities

Bring your stories, your critical librarianship, and your sociopolitical analysis to technology in libraries, and let’s talk.

2016 Library Juice + DLF Forum Fellowship

This year, Library Juice and Digital Library Federation (DLF) will sponsor a fellowship and travel award meant to support mid-career professionals in digital libraries and related fields.

The Library Juice + DLF Forum Fellowship is designed to offset or completely cover up to $1,250 in travel, registration, and lodging expenses associated with attending the annual DLF Forum, which will be held November 7-9, 2016 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The Library Juice + DLF Forum Fellow will additionally receive an invitation to special networking events. Fellows will be required to write a blog post about their experiences at the Forum, to be published by the DLF and shared in Library Juice news venues.

[More information]

June 27, 2016

Images from our presence at ALA in Orlando

Some pics from our booth at ALA…


Our booth, with Michelle Montalbano


Books


Our booth, with Lacey Torge


Michelle


Caroline Gardner and Liz Lieutenant


Aliqae Geraci, holding one of her favorites, In Solidarity: Academic Librarian Labour Activism and Union Participation in Canada


Kyle Shockey, future LJP author, and friend (who is perhaps also a future LJP author)


Laura-Edythe Coleman, holding a book she has a chapter in: Progressive Community Action: Critical Theory and Social Justice in Library and Information Science


Mark Alfino and Laura Koltutsky, accepting the 2016 Eli M. Oboler Award for their book, The Library Juice Press Handbook of Intellectual Freedom


Shaundra Walker, holding a copy of Where are All the Librarians of Color?, which she has a chapter in. Shaundra is also the instructor for a Library Juice Academy course: Cultural Competence for the Academic Librarian


Madeleine Charney, instructor for the LJA course running next month, The Sustainability Movement on Campus: Forming a Library Action Plan for Engagement, and contributor to the book she is holding up, Focus on Educating for Sustainability: Toolkit for Academic Libraries


Packing up to go home, saying “See you next time!” to Jen Hoyer.

June 8, 2016

Celebrating GLBT Book Month – A few of our titles

We want to recognize and celebrate that June is GLBT Book Month, and draw attention to a few of our titles:

New from ALA: Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy

ALA’s OIF has begun publication of a new journal, the Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy (JIFP). It replaces and expands the Newsletter on Intellectual Freedom (NIF).

The table of contents is here.

You will notice an article by yours truly, which is about SRRT’s Alternatives in Print Task Force, the attention to media monopoly issues in the 80s and 90s, and a related 2007 report from the IFC “Subcommittee on the Impact of Media Concentration on Libraries.”

Additionally, in the review section there is a review of the recent Library Juice Press publication, Where are all the Librarians of Color? The Experiences of People of Color in Academia.

We’re proud to be a part of this first issue of JIFP, and we look forward to seeing future issues.