July 27, 2015

Call for Papers: Deadline Extended for Inaugural Issue of JCLIS

Call for Papers: Deadline Extended for Inaugural Issue

Theme: Why is the Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies needed today?

The Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies is a peer-reviewed open access journal which addresses the need for critical discourse in library and information science and associated domains such as communication and media studies. It critically engages the cultural forms, social practices, the political economy, and the history of information and information institutions. It also seeks to broaden the methodological commitments of the field and to broaden the scope of library and information studies by applying diverse critical, trans-disciplinary, and global perspectives. The journal engages issues of social and cognitive justice and the historical and contemporary roles of documentary, information, and computational technologies in creating, mediating, surveilling, and challenging personal and social identities in cultural and political economies of power and expression.

For its inaugural issue, the JCLIS will focus on why such a journal is needed, as a platform for critical discourse in LIS. JCLIS seeks to publish research articles, literature reviews, and possibly other essay forms (up to 7000 words) that use or examine critical perspectives on library and information studies. Some of the issues that might be addressed are: What are the current gaps in disciplines and discourses that make the JCLIS necessary? How can scholars speak to past silences in research and thinking in information studies? What is “critical perspective” in library and information studies research? What ethical or political commitments might a critical perspective entail? What do critical perspectives look like in practice?

The theme for the inaugural issue is broad by design in order to encourage diverse perspectives in describing, analyzing, and providing insight into how and where library and information studies might intersect with ethical, philosophical, and/or political concerns, interpretative or speculative approaches to analysis, or experimentation with novel, unique, or exploratory research designs that might be marginalized or excluded from mainstream library and information studies research. JCLIS aims to be a an inclusive platform for library and information studies research,including locally specific research designs and investigations as well as research that adopts a more global or international frame of inquiry. To that end, the journal also welcomes unpublished works in translation.

Deadline for receipt of manuscripts has been extended to December 18th, 2015.

Possible topic areas may include (but are not limited to):

– What is/are critical library and information studies? What might distinguish critical approaches?

– The use of a particular critical perspective for research into topics relevant to library and information studies

– Different notions of critical approaches and perspectives, and their relations to information and knowledge studies and research

– When and why are critical approaches timely? How does its timeliness or not apply to today’s problems of information and knowledge?

– Applications of critical approaches in information institution, organization, or community contexts of practice.

– How critical approaches or methods might relate to other contemporary topics within library and information studies: open access, patron privacy, evolutions in scholarly communication, digital humanities, etc.

– How are critical perspectives included or excluded from empirical or engineering methods in the information and library sciences?

– Descriptions and reflections on methods for conducting library and information studies research with a critical approach. What is the relationship of method tocritical activity?

– Critical perspectives on race and ethnicity in LIS, and/or the need for critical perspectives in LIS research.

– How might postcolonial theory expand the scope and methods of LIS research?

– Critical approaches for investigating militarism and the politics of information.

– Development/Implementation of information services for diasporic populations.

– What has been the relation of critical theory to the LIS tradition and its modes of historical, qualitative, and quantitative research?

– What is the relationship of critical theory to LIS education and to LIS research?

– Failures and shortcomings: how can critical perspectives inform and improve library and information studies?

– Gender and identity within LIS: how might critical perspectives or approaches be used to explore or investigate them?

– #critlib and alternative platforms for critical professional conversation

– Library and information studies versus library and information science: What are the differences?

Types of Submissions
JCLIS welcomes the following types of submissions:

Research Articles (no more than 7000 words)
Perspective Essays (no more than 5000 words)
Literature Reviews (no more than 7000 words)
Interviews (no more than 5000 words)
Book or Exhibition Reviews (no more than 1200 words)
Research articles and literature reviews are subject to peer review by two referees. Perspective essays are subject to peer review by one referee. Interviews and book or exhibition reviews are subject to review by the issue editor(s).

Contacts
Guest Editors for the Inaugural Issue of JCLIS
Please direct questions to the guest editors for the issue:

Ronald Day, Indiana University – Bloomington: roday@indiana.edu
Alycia Sellie, Graduate Center, City University of New York: ASellie@gc.cuny.edu
Andrew J Lau, UCLA Extension: andrewjlau@ucla.edu

Journal Editors
Associate Editor: Emily Drabinski
Associate Editor: Rory Litwin
Managing Editor: Andrew J Lau

Description of the Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies

The mission of the Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies is to serve as a peer-reviewed platform for critical discourse in and around library and information studies from across the disciplines. This includes but is not limited to research on the political economy of information, information institutions such as libraries, archives, and museums, reflections on professional contexts and practices, questioning current paradigms and academic trends, questioning the terms of information science, exploring methodological issues in the context of the field, and otherwise enriching and broadening the scope of library and information studies by applying diverse critical and trans-disciplinary perspectives. Recognizing library and information studies as a diverse, cross-disciplinary field reflective of the scholarly community’s diverse range of interests, theories, and methods, JCLIS aims to showcase innovative research that queries and critiques current paradigms in theory and practice through perspectives that originate from across the humanities and social sciences.

Each issue is themed around a particular topic or set of topics, and features a guest editor (or guest editors) who will work with the managing editor to shape the issue’s theme and develop an associated call for papers. Issue editors will assist in the shepherding of manuscripts through the review and preparation processes, are encouraged to widely solicit potential contributions, and work with authors in scoping their respective works appropriately.

JCLIS is open access in publication, politics, and philosophy. In a world where paywalls are the norm for access to scholarly research, the Journal recognizes that removal of barriers to accessing information is key to the production and sharing of knowledge. Authors retain copyright of manuscripts published in JCLIS, generally with a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license. If an article is republished after initially publication in JCLIS, the republished article should indicate that it was first published by JCLIS.

Submission Guidelines for Authors
The Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies welcomes submissions from senior and junior faculty, students, activists, and practitioners working in areas of research and practice at the intersection of critical theory and library and information studies.

Authors retain the copyright to material they publish in the JCLIS, but the Journal cannot re-publish material that has previously been published elsewhere. The journal also cannot accept manuscripts that have been simultaneously submitted to another outlet for possible publication.

Citation Style
JCLIS uses the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th Edition as the official citation style for manuscripts published by the journal. All manuscripts should employ the Notes and Bibliography style (as footnotes with a bibliography), and should conform to the guidelines as described in the Manual.

Submission Process
Manuscripts are to be submitted through JCLIS’ online submission system (http://libraryjuicepress.com/journals/index.php/jclis) by December 18th, 2015. This online submission process requires that manuscripts be submitted in separate stages in order to ensure the anonymity of the review process and to enable appropriate formatting.

Abstracts (500 words or less) should be submitted in plain text and should not include information identifying the author(s) or their institutional affiliations. With the exception of book reviews, an abstract must accompany all manuscript submissions before they are reviewed for publication.

The main text of the manuscript must be submitted as a stand-alone file (in Microsoft Word or RTF)) without a title page, abstract, page numbers, or other headers or footers. The title, abstract, and author information should be submitted through the submission platform.

July 23, 2015

A Decade of Critical Information Literacy: A Review of the Literature

A Decade of Critical Information Literacy: A Review of the Literature

By Eamon Tewell

From Communications in Information Literacy, Vol. 9, No. 1 (2015)

ABSTRACT

As information literacy continues in its centrality to many academic libraries’ missions, a line of inquiry has developed in response to ACRL’s charge to develop information literate citizens. The literature of critical information literacy questions widely held assumptions about information literacy and considers in what ways librarians may encourage students to engage with and act upon information’s complex and inherently political nature. This review explores the research into critical information literacy, including critical pedagogy and critiques of information literacy, in order to provide an entry point for this emerging and challenging approach to information literacy.

Full text: PDF

July 21, 2015

Interview with Catelynne Sahadath

Catelynne Sahadath is the Head of Metadata Development at the University of Calgary, where she manages the cataloging section, where she was responsible for leading their transition from AACR2 to RDA in 2013. Catelynne has previously worked on cataloging and digitization projects for the Government of Canada, and her research focuses on change management in technical services and the impacts of cataloguing changes on public services. Catelynn is teaching a class for us next month, on AACR2 Legacy Practices, and a class in September titled, Introduction to Library Classification in Dewey and LC. She agreed to do an interview about these classes for the LJA blog.

July 17, 2015

Project ARCC

From the website:

Project ARCC is a task force of archivists striving to motivate the archival profession to affect climate change. We seek to achieve a four-fold mission:

– Protect archival collections from the impact of climate change
– Reduce our professional carbon and ecological footprint
– Elevate climate change related archival collections to improve public awareness and understanding of climate change
– Preserve this epochal moment in history for future research and understanding

Sounds good to me!!!

http://projectarcc.org/

July 16, 2015

CFP – Conceptual Crowbars and Classification at the Crossroads: The Impact and Future of Classification Research

Conceptual Crowbars and Classification at the Crossroads: The Impact and Future of Classification Research

Workshop sponsored by ASIS&T SIG/Classification Research
ASIS&T 2015 Annual Meeting
Saturday, November 7, 2015, 8:30 AM – 12:30 PM
Hyatt Regency St. Louis at the Arch, USA

This year’s Classification Research workshop consciously and critically engages the general conference theme, “Information Science with Impact,” in order to frame conversations about the results and significance of classification research. With the increasing emphasis on impact in and around information science, the theme provides us with an opportunity to consider some of the ways in which we define ourselves as a Classification Research group and how we understand our research to affect and influence theory and practice. Classification matters not only in the functioning of information systems and technologies, but also in the lived experiences of individuals, and in society, organizations, and all information contexts.

The spate of violent events in the U.S., together with the resistance and response, quickens a crucial set of questions about the nature of our work. This workshop aims to cast such violence as a knowledge organization problem. We also aim to consider whether and how classificatory acts and systems can be reparative, or even transformative: What bearing does the structuring of knowledge have upon the seeking, reception, circulation, and use of knowledge and information? Do classifications tell us something about agendas, political contexts, or authority? What role do our classification systems play in constituting, and challenging categories of difference? In what ways have communities used and/or challenged classifications in civic action and protest?

We welcome papers that address positive or negative and intended or unintended consequences of classification, as well as papers and projects that explore potential and possibilities for classification systems and research. Doctoral students are encouraged to submit paper/presentation proposals, and two scholarships covering workshop fees will be awarded to student authors. We also invite presentations and posters of classification design projects in any stage of development, as well as nontraditional presentation formats.

We are interested in work that addresses questions and issues such as the following:

· Encounters with classification in daily life, on- and off-line
· Material effects of classifications, e.g., how do classifications bar or grant access to information, and in what ways does this matter?
· Structures and hierarchies and their effects and consequences
· Design and aesthetics in classifications
· Consequences of specific systems or types of systems, e.g., thesauri, universal classifications, folksonomies
· Reparative/transformative classifications
· Classification research as it relates to diversity initiatives
· Limitations and possibilities for assessing impact of classifications
· The role of classifications in constituting and ordering value in information science, i.e., how measurements of impact rely upon the classification and ranking of what counts as research, users, and knowledge
· Critical / theoretical discussions of classifications, e.g., critical race studies, queer theory, disability studies
· Classificatory mechanisms as tools for building or dividing communities
· Classifications as reflections of agencies, nations, individuals, or organizations
· Classifications in particular contexts, e.g., health information, libraries, archives, the Semantic Web, Linked Open Data, social media, etc.
· Knowledge organization in scientific and political debates, e.g. climate change
· The construction of users (user types, user communities, user identities) through classification

Deadlines:

August 20, 2015: Submit abstracts of no more than 500 words for a paper, poster, or alternative format presentation to Melissa Adler: melissa.adler@uky.edu
Include your name, title, and institutional affiliation with your submission.

September 10, 2015: Tentative author notification date, to be determined so that authors will be notified ahead of the early bird registration date.

Fees:

$100, SIG/CR members
$110, non-SIG/CR members
(Fees increase after the early bird registration deadline)

Organizers:
Melissa Adler, University of Kentucky
Jonathan Furner, UCLA
Barbara H. Kwasnik, Syracuse
Joseph T. Tennis, University of Washington

July 14, 2015

Interview with Megan Wacha

Megan Wacha is the Scholarly Communications Librarian at the City University of New York. Driven by the statement that Wikipedia is “the encyclopedia that anyone can edit,” she utilizes this open resource to teach information literacy skills and to make underrepresented groups more visible on Wikipedia. She has presented this work at conferences such as the LITA Forum, ALA Annual, WikiConference USA and Wikimania, the global Wikipedia conference. Megan is teaching a class for Library Juice Academy next month, titled, Wikipedia: Library Initiatives and Expert Editing. She agreed to do an interview on the LJA blog to give people a better idea of what they will learn from her class and a bit about her background for teaching it.

July 13, 2015

2015-16 Catalog

Download the Litwin Books/Library Juice Press 2015-16 Catalog

Download it…

July 11, 2015

CFP: The Feminists Among Us: Resistance and Advocacy in Library Leadership

The Feminists Among Us: Resistance and Advocacy in Library Leadership

Call for Proposals

Editors: Shirley Lew and Baharak Yousefi
Publisher: Library Juice Press

The Feminists Among Us: Resistance and Advocacy in Library Leadership aims to make explicit the ways in which a grounding in feminist theory and practice impacts the work of library administrators who identify as feminists.

Recent scholarship by LIS researchers and practitioners on the intersections of gender with sexuality, race, class, and other social categories within libraries and other information environments have highlighted the need and desire of this community to engage with these concepts both in theory and praxis.

The current project adds to this conversation by focusing on a subset of feminist LIS professionals and researchers in leadership roles who engage critically with both management work and librarianship. By collecting these often implicit professional acts, interactions, and dynamics and naming them as explicitly feminist, these accounts will both document aspects of an existing community of practice as well as invite fellow feminists, advocates, and resisters to consider library leadership as a career path.

Proposals might consider questions such as:

  • Do current practices in library leadership training encourage a critique of power structures within librarianship?
  • What does a feminist-led library or information organization look and feel like?
  • What are the synergies between feminist and the open knowledge movements?
  • How can feminists in library leadership best mentor future feminist leaders? What are the consequences of feminist librarians avoiding leadership work for the profession as a whole?
  • How might feminist leaders best advocate for anti-oppression work and confront white privilege in their libraries?
  • What are examples of intersectional feminist strategies within library leadership?
  • In professional contexts where librarians have academic freedom, are they exercising that freedom fully? If not, why not?
  • “Good” vs. “bad” feminism: is there a hierarchy of acceptance of feminist practice within ILS?
  • How can a feminist framework guide the work of developing collection policies?
  • In our professional history, what are the ways in which librarians have used a feminist framework in their practice of leadership?
  • Feminist leaders are often found leading from without, rather than from within, our institutions. Is this due to personal choice, institutional barriers, or are there other forces at play?

Proposals

Proposals can cover a variety of professional and theoretical topics and methodologies.
Submissions concerning the intersection of gender with sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, and class within the context of library leadership are strongly encouraged. Established and emerging practitioners, scholars, and activists are encouraged to submit proposals by December 7, 2015.

Proposals should contain 1) an abstract of no more than 500 words describing the proposed contribution and 2) a brief biographical statement about the author(s). Submit proposals to feministsamongus@gmail.com.

About the Editors

Shirley Lew is Director, Library and Learning Centre at Vancouver Community College. She is Past-President of the BC Book Prizes, Director on the Vancouver Writers Fest Board, and an active member in professional and literary arts communities for fifteen years. She has a Bachelor of Arts in Human Geography and Master of Library and Information Studies.

Baharak Yousefi is Head Librarian at Simon Fraser University’s Surrey Campus Library and a Director on the Board of the BC Libraries Cooperative. She received a Master of Arts in Women’s Studies in 2003 and a Master of Library and Information Studies in 2007. She lives on the unceded traditional lands of the Musqueam, Skwxwu7mesh, and Tsleil-Waututh people in Vancouver, BC.

July 1, 2015

2015 Litwin Books Award for Ongoing Dissertation Research in the Philosophy of Information

We are pleased to announce the winner of the 2015 Litwin Books Award for Ongoing Dissertation Research in the Philosophy of Information. We are granting this year’s award to Quinn DuPont of the Faculty of Information at the University of Toronto, based on his dissertation project, tentatively titled, “Plaintext, Encryption, and Ciphertext: A History of Cryptography and its Influence on Contemporary Society.” DuPont’s nominating faculty member wrote:

“His intellectual background allows for cross-pollination of rigorous theoretical approaches from different fields and is useful as a way to add dimension to media archaeology, which has its roots in history and the social sciences. This hybridization adds theory to empirical research, while forcing information studies into a theoretical conversation of its own methods.”

The award consists of a certificate suitable for framing and $1000 check.

Since this award is for ongoing research, other applicants who are still working on their dissertations will be eligible to enter their work next year, and we strongly encourage them to do so.

For more information about the award, please visit http://litwinbooks.com/award.php.

Rory Litwin
Litwin Books, LLC
PO Box 188784
Sacramento, CA 95818