October 13, 2017

NEW: Feminists Among Us: Resistance and Advocacy in Library Leadership

Feminists Among Us: Resistance and Advocacy in Library Leadership

Editors: Shirley Lew and Baharak Yousefi
Price: $22.00
Published: October 2017
ISBN: 978-1-63400-027-7

Number nine in the Litwin Books Series on Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies, Emily Drabinski, Series Editor

Feminists Among Us: Resistance and Advocacy in Library Leadership makes explicit the ways in which a grounding in feminist theory and practice impacts the work of library administrators who identify as feminists.

Recent scholarship by LIS researchers and practitioners on the intersections of gender with sexuality, race, class, and other social categories within libraries and other information environments have highlighted the need and desire of this community to engage with these concepts both in theory and praxis.

Feminists Among Us adds to this conversation by focusing on a subset of feminist LIS professionals and researchers in leadership roles who engage critically with both management work and librarianship. By collecting these often implicit professional acts, interactions, and dynamics and naming them as explicitly feminist, these accounts both document aspects of an existing community of practice as well as invite fellow feminists, advocates, and resisters to consider library leadership as a career path.

About the Editors

Shirley Lew is Dean, Library, Teaching & Learning Services at Vancouver Community College. She is Past-President of the BC Book Prizes, Director on the Vancouver Writers Fest Board, and an active member in professional and literary arts communities for fifteen years. She has a Bachelor of Arts in Human Geography and Master of Library and Information Studies.

Baharak Yousefi is Head of Library Communications at Simon Fraser University and a Director on the Board of the BC Libraries Cooperative. She received a Master of Arts in Women’s Studies in 2003 and a Master of Library and Information Studies in 2007. She lives on the unceded traditional lands of the Musqueam, Skwxwu7mesh, and Tsleil-Waututh people in Vancouver, BC.

This book is now available on Amazon.

NEW: The Feminist Reference Desk: Concepts, Critiques, and Conversations

The Feminist Reference Desk: Concepts, Critiques, and Conversations

Editor: Maria T. Accardi
Price: $35.00
Published: October 2017
ISBN: 978-1-63400-018-5

Number eight in the Litwin Books Series on Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies, Emily Drabinski, Series Editor

Feminist pedagogy employs strategies such as collaborative learning, valuing experiential knowledge, employing consciousness-raising about sexism and other forms of oppression, and destabilizing the power hierarchies of the traditional classroom. Ultimately, feminist library instruction seeks to empower learners to be both critical thinkers and critical actors who are motivated and prepared to bring about social change. The concept of feminist pedagogy has recently energized current conversations on library instruction, so it is fitting and timely to consider how feminism might intersect with another vital student-centered service the academic library provides: the reference desk. Inspired by the ideas, possibilities, and discussions set in motion by Maria T. Accardi’s Feminist Pedagogy for Library Instruction (2013), this edited collection continues these conversations by considering how feminist strategies and philosophies might reshape, invigorate, and critique approaches to reference services. In short, this collection will provide critical and thought-provoking explorations of how academic librarians might rethink central reference concepts and services, from the reference interview, to the reference collection, to the staffing of the reference desk itself, from a feminist perspective.

About the Editor: Maria T. Accardi is the author of Feminist Pedagogy for Library Instruction (2013), for which she received the 2014 ACRL WGSS Significant Achievement Award, and a co-editor of Critical Library Instruction: Theories and Methods (2010). She is Associate Librarian and Coordinator of Instruction and Reference at Indiana University Southeast in New Albany, Indiana.

This book is now Available on Amazon.

October 3, 2017

CFP: Comics and Critical Librarianship for Academic Libraries

Call for chapter proposals
 
Working Title: Comics and Critical Librarianship for Academic Libraries
Editors: Olivia Miller & Stephanie Grimm
Submission Deadline: December 15, 2017
Publisher: Library Juice Press

(This CFP as a PDF file)
 
Book description
This book will be a collection of chapters on ways comics have been used in the practice of critical librarianship. The intended audiences for this book are librarians and library workers that currently or hope to work with comics in academic libraries, people interested in critical librarianship, and comics scholars. The purpose of this book is to add to the conversation of critical librarianship within academic libraries by highlighting the use and focus of an already radical medium (comics) by librarians and library workers who practice critical librarianship.

For the purposes of this book, we use the term “comics” to mean any work in the medium of comics/sequential art. This can mean comic book issues, graphic novels, comic strips, webcomics, minicomics, etc.

We want both critical librarianship and comics to be approachable and accessible topics to our readers. One way we aim to do this is through approachable language much in the way that Maria T. Accardi did in Feminist Pedagogy for Library Instruction.
 
Possible topics
 
Possible topic areas include but are not limited to the following:
• Critical considerations of:
 o comics in academic library exhibitions or programming
 o comics in library instruction in higher education contexts
 o cataloging practices in relation to comics
 o acquisition or collection management/organization practices for comics and comics collections
 o comics or comics ephemera in special collections, archives, or manuscript collections
• Case studies on the critical use of comics in academic libraries and special collections
• Theoretical or research-based considerations of comics as a tool and site for critical librarianship
• Other relevant considerations of the topic 
Timeline
 
• Abstract submission deadline: December 15, 2017
• Notification/Feedback regarding submission: January 31, 2018
• First drafts due: June 15, 2018
• Final drafts due: October 15, 2018
• Final manuscript due to publisher: December 2018
 
Submissions
 
Please email abstracts of up to 500 words to critlibcomics (at) gmail (dot) com.
Abstracts should briefly describe your topic and how your chapter discusses using comics in critical librarianship. You are welcome to submit multiple abstracts about different possible topics. If your submission is tentatively accepted, the editors may request modifications. Material cannot be previously published.
 
Final chapters will be in the 2000-5000-word range. Abstracts that discuss comics being used in critical librarianship practices in tribal college libraries, HBCUs, Hispanic-serving institutions, community colleges, archives, special libraries, and libraries outside the United States are especially welcome.
 
Please direct any questions to Olivia Miller and Stephanie Grimm, editors, at critlibcomics (at) gmail (dot) com.
 
 
About the Editors
 
Olivia Miller (she/her) is the Arts & Humanities Librarian at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. Her BA is in Art History and English from the University of North Carolina Greensboro and she attended the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill for her MSLS. She built a strong graphic novel collection in her last position at Greensboro College and taught a for-credit course for two semesters on how to read and find comics with a feminist pedagogy.

Stephanie Grimm (she/her) is the Art and Art History Librarian at George Mason University in Fairfax, VA. She holds a BFA in Illustration and earned her MSI from the University of Michigan, where she developed a dedicated minicomics collection within the university libraries. She has worked with comics and illustration students at both art & design schools and research universities, and is a proponent of critical librarianship and literacy for artists and design students.

September 14, 2017

New book: Topographies of Whiteness: Mapping Whiteness in Library and Information Science

Topographies of Whiteness: Mapping Whiteness in Library and Information Science (cover)

Topographies of Whiteness: Mapping Whiteness in Library and Information Science

Editor: Gina Schlesselman-Tarango
Price: $35.00
Published: September 2017
ISBN: 978-1-63400-022-2
350 Pages

Exploring the diverse terrain that makes up library and information science (LIS), this collection features the work of scholars, practitioners, and others who draw from a variety of theoretical approaches to name, problematize, and ultimately fissure whiteness at work. Contributors not only provide critical accounts of the histories of whiteness – particularly as they have shaped libraries and archives in higher education – but also interrogate current formations, from the policing of people of color in library spaces to imagined LIS futures. This volume also considers possibilities for challenging oppressive legacies and charting a new course towards anti-racist librarianship, whether in the classroom, at the reference desk, or elsewhere.

Gina Schlesselman-Tarango is an Instructional Services and Initiatives Librarian at California State University, San Bernardino. She facilitates critical information literacy opportunities for students and faculty, teaches a first-year seminar course, provides reference services, and is a collection development liaison to sociology, criminal justice, and gender and sexuality studies programs. She holds a BA in sociology/anthropology, a master’s of social sciences, and an MLIS. Her research interests include gender and race in LIS, critical information literacy, and feminist navigations of infertility.

This book is number two in the Litwin Books/Library Juice Press Series on Critical Race Studies and Multiculturalism in LIS, Rose L. Chou and Annie Pho, series editors.

Available from Amazon.

August 31, 2017

CFP: GSISC18: Work

WORK: GSISC 18
#gsisc18

How do gender and sexuality WORK in library and information studies?

Gender and sexuality play various roles in the production, organization, dissemination, and consumption of information of all kinds. As categories of social identity, they do not act alone but in interaction and intersection with race, class, nation, language, ability and disability, and other social structures and systems. These intersections have been explored by information studies scholars, librarians, archivists, and other information sector workers in various contexts, including at two previous colloquia in Toronto (2014) and Vancouver (2016).

The planning committee for the 2018 Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies Colloquium invites you to continue these conversations July 20-21, 2018 in Boston, Massachusetts at Simmons College.

We invite submissions that address gender and sexuality and WORK: working it and doing the work, organized labor and emotional labor. The colloquium takes place in a moment of intensification both of various systems of oppression and resistance movements to them. As conservative national, state, and local politics and policies threaten healthcare and abortion rights, intensify the militarization of national borders, and attack organized labor from multiple directions, we are heartened by surges of organizing, activism, and direct action against them. In the information sector we see renewed focus on issues related to diversity and inclusion, open access and open collections, and critical approaches to everything from teaching to data management. Feminist and queer theory and practice are central to the work of making new and just worlds.

We are especially interested in submissions that link gender and sexuality to other, intersecting forms of difference. Potential topics might include:

– Gender, race, and class dimensions of “professionalism”
– Sex and sexuality in materials selection, organization, preservation, and access
– Intersections of social, political, and cultural organization with information organization
– Information practices of diversity, equity, and inclusion
– The work of the “normal” in information studies and practice
– Labor organizing in information workplaces
– The ways that gendered or feminized labor is and is not documented in the historical record
– “Resistance” as a mode of information work
– Ability and disability as structuring forces in libraries and archives
– How information workers inhabit, deploy, restrict, and manifest as bodies at work
– Eroding distinctions between work and leisure
– Distinctions between embodied, emotional, intellectual information work
– Contingent and precarious labor in the information workplace
– Ethics of care and empathy in information work
– Masculinity and power in libraries and archives
– Desire in the library and archive

We invite submissions from individuals as well as pre-constituted panels. Submit your proposals here: https://bit.ly/GSISC18

Deadline for submission: December 1, 2017
Notification by February 1, 2018
Registration opens February 15, 2018

Please direct any questions or concerns to Emily Drabinski at emily.drabinski@gmail.com

August 26, 2017

Recording of webinar on working with LJP

We ran a webinar yesterday titled “Working with Library Juice Press: An Orientation.” It was recorded, and the recording is available here.

Here’s the description of the webinar:

This free webinar will provide an overview of the processes involved in having a book published with Library Juice Press or Litwin Books. Topics covered will include types of books we publish, submitting a proposal, working with your editor, creating a quality manuscript, and an overview and timeline of the publishing process. The intended audience is anyone curious about our publishing process, particularly those who are potentially interested in submitting a book proposal to us. Authors and editors who currently have a book contract with us may also wish to attend. The presentation will last approximately 45 minutes, with 10-15 minutes for questions afterwards.

July 23, 2017

CFP: Ethical Questions in Name Authority Control

Call for chapter proposals
Working Title: Ethical Questions in Name Authority Control
Editor: Jane Sandberg
Submission Deadline: October 20, 2017
Publisher: Library Juice Press

Book description
Catalogers hold very specific types of power when they describe people, families, and corporate bodies. When creating a personal name authority record, for example, catalogers determine the authorized name by which an individual will be known, then identify a few characteristics of the individual that distinguish them from others, while balancing their judgment with respect for the individual’s self-concept. This is a powerful position, and that power must be exercised ethically.

As name authority control moves toward an identity management model, catalogers are taking on new roles, authority data is used in innovative ways, and libraries increasingly interact with non-library datasets and name disambiguation algorithms. During this transition, it is imperative that the library community reflect on the ethical questions that arise from its historical and emerging practices.

The present volume raises many of these questions in the hope of building toward a framework for the ethical practice of name authority control. This framework would include — at minimum — the following concepts:
* Respect for the people described in authority systems, including deceased people
* Fulfillment of name authority control objectives for names from a variety of cultural naming traditions and personal histories
* Local community needs
* Acknowledgment of historical and contemporary injustices
* Consideration of potential future uses of authority data
* Ethical employment practices

This collection will explore and develop this framework through theoretical and practice-based essays, stories, content analyses, and other methods. As it explores ethical questions in a variety of settings, this book will deepen readers’ understanding of names, identities, and library catalogs. The chapters from this volume are intended to spark conversations among librarians, archivists, library technologists, library administrators, and library and information science students.

Possible topics
Possible topics include but are not limited to the following:
* Ethical dimensions of an identity management approach to authority control (e.g. how should catalogers approach linking to flawed name authority data?)
* Responses to the PCC Ad Hoc Task Group on Gender in Name Authority Records recommendations
* Representations of people with Arabic, CJK, and Indigenous names in Google Scholar, ISNI, ORCID, Scopus, and online repositories
* Applying contemporary gender and demographic terms to non-contemporary people
* Describing people using demographic terms taken from thesauri other than LCSH or LC Demographic Group Terms (e.g. First Nations House of Learning thesaurus, Homosaurus)
* Barriers (technological, structural, etc.) to ethical name authority control
* Assumptions and flaws in name disambiguation and clustering algorithms
* Author privacy concerns
* Online name authority files in the context of right-to-be-forgotten laws
* Decolonizing name authority files
* Ethical dimensions of corporate and family name authority control
* Creating authority data in conjunction with the people and groups they describe
* Emotional labor in name authority work
* Connections between hiring and employment practices and name authority work
* Ethical name authority questions in consortial environments
* Effective advocacy for ethical name authority control and identity management practices

Timeline
Abstract submission deadline: October 20, 2017
Notification/Feedback regarding submission: December 1, 2017
First drafts due: April 13, 2018
Final drafts due: June 8, 2018
Final manuscript due to publisher: July, 2018

Submissions
Please email abstracts of up to 500 words to sandbej [at] linnbenton [dot] edu.

Abstracts should briefly describe your topic and how your chapter will help to build a framework of ethical name authority control practice. You are welcome to submit multiple abstracts about different possible topics. If your submission is tentatively accepted, the editor may request modifications. Material cannot be previously published.

Final chapters will be in the 2000-5000 word range. The volume will contain perspectives from a range of NACO and non-NACO libraries. Abstracts that explore the ethical dimensions of name authority work in tribal libraries, HBCUs, Hispanic-serving institutions, community colleges, public libraries, archives, school libraries, special libraries, and libraries outside the United States are particularly encouraged.

Please direct any questions to Jane Sandberg (sandbej [at] linnbenton [dot] edu).

About the Editor
Jane Sandberg received her MLIS from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is the Electronic Resources Librarian at Linn-Benton Community College in Albany, Oregon, where she coordinates library cataloging and systems. Her research interests include linked data approaches to name authority control, queer and trans local histories, open source software in rural communities, and historical dimensions of online transgender activism.

Webinar: Working with Library Juice Press: An Orientation

Working with Library Juice Press: An Orientation

Presenter: Alison M. Lewis, Library Juice Press

This free webinar will provide an overview of the processes involved in having a book published with Library Juice Press or Litwin Books. Topics covered will include types of books we publish, submitting a proposal, working with your editor, creating a quality manuscript, and an overview and timeline of the publishing process. The intended audience is anyone curious about our publishing process, particularly those who are potentially interested in submitting a book proposal to us. Authors and editors who currently have a book contract with us may also wish to attend. The presentation will last approximately 45 minutes, with 10-15 minutes for questions afterwards.

August 25th, 1pm EDT. One hour duration.

No prior registration is necessary. Just go here at the meeting time:
https://libraryjuice.adobeconnect.com/working-with-ljp/

July 19, 2017

JCLIS Vol 1, No 2 (2017): Critical Archival Studies

Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies

Vol 1, No 2 (2017): Critical Archival Studies
Guest Editors: Michelle Caswell, Ricardo Punzalan, and T-Kay Sangwand

Table of Contents

Editors’ Note

Critical Archival Studies: An Introduction
Michelle Caswell, Ricardo Punzalan, T-Kay Sangwand

Articles

A Matter of Life or Death: A Critical Examination of the Role of Records and Archives in Supporting the Agency of the Forcibly Displaced
Anne J. Gilliland

Critical Archiving and Recordkeeping Research and Practice in the Continuum
Joanne Evans, Sue McKemmish, Greg Rolan

Archives Without Archives: (Re)Locating and (Re)Defining the Archive Through Post-Custodial Praxis
Christian Kelleher

Archival Amnesty: In Search of Black American Transitional and Restorative Justice
Tonia Sutherland

Power to the People: Documenting Police Violence in Cleveland
Stacie M Williams, Jarrett Drake

Appraising Newness: Whiteness, Neoliberalism & the Building of the Archive for New Poetry
Eunsong Kim

Insistering Derrida: Cixous, Deconstruction, and the Work of Archive
Verne Harris

Critical Feminism in the Archives
Marika Cifor, Stacy Wood

A Queer/ed Archival Methodology: Archival Bodies as Nomadic Subjects
Jamie Ann Lee

ISSN: 2572-1364

July 9, 2017

New book: Queer Library Alliance: Global Reflections and Imaginings

Queer Library Alliance: Global Reflections and Imaginings

Editors: Rae-Anne Montague and Lucas McKeever
Price: $35.00
Published: July 2017
ISBN: 978-1-63400-031-4
282 pages

Available on Amazon.

Queer identities are complex. They are embedded in a web of intersectionality and often challenging to fully define. Sometimes queerness shines like a beacon and this radiance is captured in media. Sometimes it is more subtle. Often it is invisible. Promoting understanding and visibility are primary goals of this anthology. As library professionals that create, utilize, and make accessible systems of organization and classification for information, intersectionality must remain a clear objective in addressing these historical absences. These topics represent some of our efforts to respond to challenges, address critical needs, and serve as essential forces against systematic oppression across service areas, library types, and borders. The first section of this collection of essays looks at how we are developing understanding and library services that reflect and are responsive to LGBTQ user needs. The second emphasizes opportunities and approaches for augmenting queer professional practice, which ultimately benefits our diverse library users. Contributors hail from, reside in, and study issues from several countries around the world including Canada, Democratic Republic of Congo, England, India, Japan, Sweden, and the U.S.A. With many areas of the world not represented in this text, we recognize biases inherent in our perspectives. As librarians, archivists, and other information professionals committed to facilitating access and high-quality services for LGBTQ- and other marginalized users, it is important to stress that this is just one step in a larger process. There is still much more to consider and do as we continue to advocate for equity in library services to all.

Rae-Anne Montague is Director of Outreach Programs at Hawai’i Pacific University and affiliate faculty at the University of Hawai’i at M?noa Library and Information Science Program. Her interests include community engagement, inquiry, and social justice. She has developed and provided leadership for several LIS initiatives including WISE (Web-based Information Science Education) and LAMP (LIS Access Midwest Program). She is currently working with E Noelo I Ka ‘Ike (To Search for Knowledge), a project designed to increase awareness and understanding of Hawaiian resource materials.

Lucas McKeever is the Head of Technical Services at Elmwood Park Public Library near Chicago, Illinois. Since 2013, he has been an active coordinator of the LGBTQ Users Special Interest Group of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA). Additionally, he has served on the Rainbow Book List Committee of the GLBT Round Table of the American Library Association and has been named an American Library Association Emerging Leader. Previously, Lucas was the director of the Gerber/Hart Library and Archives, an organization committed to documenting and preserving facets of LGBTQ life in the Midwestern United States.

July 2, 2017

Library Juice Grants and Awards

The Library Juice Press Annual Paper Contest
Rewarding good work in the field of library and information studies, humanistically understood, through a monetary award and public recognition. Criteria for judgment are clarity of writing; originality of thought; sincerity of effort at reaching something true; soundness of argumentation (where applicable); and relevance to our time and situation.

The Litwin Books Award for Ongoing Doctoral Dissertation Research in the Philosophy of Information
An award that consists of $1,000, given annually to a graduate student who is working on a dissertation on the philosophy of information (broadly construed). As we see it, the range of philosophical questions relating to information is broad, and approachable through a variety of philosophical traditions (philosophy of mind, logic, philosophy of information so-called, philosophy of science, etc.).

The Litwin Books Travel Grant
Litwin Books provides financial support to scholars in LIS and related fields for travel to conferences they attend, domestically or internationally. Travel grants are limited to $500 for domestic conferences and $1000 for travel to a conference outside the recipient’s home country.

The ACRL ULS Outstanding Professional Development Award
Sponsored by Library Juice Academy, this award is intended to recognize librarians, archivists or curators whose contributions to providing professional development opportunities for librarians have been especially noteworthy or influential. The effect of these contributions may be the result of continuous or distinguished service to the profession, but may also be the result of extraordinarily active, innovative or collaborative work that deserves national recognition.

The Library Juice + DLF Forum Fellowship
This is a fellowship and travel award meant to support one mid-career professional in digital libraries and related fields. These fellowships are designed to offset travel and lodging expenses associated with attending the Forum. Library Juice+DLF Forum fellows additionally receive complimentary full registration to the Forum (up to a $750 value) and an invitation to special networking events.

June 9, 2017

Library Juice Press Annual Paper Contest

The intention of this contest is to encourage and reward good work in the field of library and information studies, humanistically understood, through a monetary award and public recognition.

The contest is open to librarians, library students, academics, and others.

Acceptable paper topics cover the full range of topics in the field of library and information studies, loosely defined.

Papers submitted may be pending publication or published (formally or informally) in the past year. Unpublished papers are acceptable if they are publicly accessible (informally published) and written in the past year.

Single and multiple-authored papers will be accepted.

Any type of paper may be entered as long as it is not a report of an empirical study. Examples of accepted forms would be literature review essays, analytical essays, historical papers, and personal essays. The work may include some informal primary research, but may not be essentially a report of a study.

Submitted papers may be part of a larger project.

The minimum length is 2000 words. The maximum length is 10,000 words.

Criteria for judgment:
Clarity of writing
Originality of thought
Sincerity of effort at reaching something true
Soundness of argumentation (where applicable)
Relevance to our time and situation

The award shall consist of $1000 and a certificate suitable for framing.

Entries must be submitted by August 1st, to inquiries@libraryjuicepress.com. Entries must be in MS Word or RTF format to facilitate removal of identifying information (PDFs not accepted).

The winning paper, and possibly a number of honorable mentions, are announced on October 1st.

Papers will be judged by a committee selected for their accomplishments in the field, and in order to represent a range of perspectives. The jury uses a blind process in which identifying information is removed from the submitted papers.

Although we are a publisher, submission of a paper for this award in itself does not imply any transfer, licensing, or sharing of your publication rights.

Past winners
2016 – Lisa Sloniowski, for “Affective Labor, Resistance, and the Academic Librarian,” published in Library Trends in 2016.
2015 – James Lowry, for “Information and the Social Contract,” unpublished at the time of award.
2014 – Michelle Caswell, for “Inventing New Archival Imaginaries: Theoretical Foundations for Identity-Based Community Archives,” published as a chapter in Identity Palimpsests: Archiving Ethnicity in the United States and Canada, Litwin Books, 2014.
2013 – Ryan Shaw, for “Information Organization and the Philosophy of History,” published in JASIST in June 2013.

June 2, 2017

Librarians, Archivists, Scholars, Educators, Artists, and Activists Tackle Climate Change

Media contact:
Rory Litwin, (916) 905-0291
rory@litwinbooks.com
P.O. Box 188784
Sacramento, CA 95818

Release date: Friday June 2, 2017
Sacramento, CA

Libraries and Archives in the Anthropocene: Colloquium 2017 (LAAC 2017) was held on May 13-14, 2017 at the Moving Image Archiving and Preservation Program at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts. About 40 librarians and archivists attended, as well as a handful of artists, educators and scholars, to explore their roles as stewards of a culture’s collective knowledge and the unique implications of the missions and activities of libraries and archives in the face of cataclysmic environmental changes. Speakers presented from HathiTrust, Future Library, The Prelinger Library, Interference Archive, The Library of Approximate Location, DearTomorrow, The Next Epoch Seed Library, Brooklyn Public Library, as well as many academic libraries and archives.

Keynote speaker Roy Scranton (author of Learning to Die in the Anthropocene and War Porn) kicked off LAAC 2017 with a note of stark pessimism around climate disruption and a call for a reckoning with a radically different future. Presentations followed as either 20-minute papers or 5-minute lightning talks and ranged from environmentally sustainable practices, climate change communication, government policy to the raising of public awareness. At times, bold envisioning countered the speculation of unraveling of systems and infrastructures — imagining an augmented role of libraries as hubs for pre- and post-disaster training, shelter, and community resilience. LAAC 2017 served as an intensive two-day opportunity for information professionals and others to explore the social and physical realities of climate disruption, peak oil, toxic waste, deforestation, food and water shortages, loss of biodiversity, mass migration, sea level rise, and extreme weather events.

A field trip to the Interference Archive in Brooklyn reinforced LAAC 2017 with its focus on cultural production and preservation vis a vis social movements, creative engagement, and the value of archival collections in accessible, open stacks in potentially threatened environments.

“I can’t underscore enough how important it was for me personally to share the weekend with librarians and archivists who ‘get’ how foundation shaking the anthropocene is for our species. I do not get this kind of affirmation in my everyday life. Despite the grave issues we discussed I left the colloquium feeling happy to connect with my new community,” wrote one attendee.

Publisher Rory Litwin of Litwin Books, the sponsor of the colloquium, said, “This event was extremely gratifying to me, as I consider the issues we discussed to be the most important issues facing us in the information and cultural heritage professions. I hope that it will turn out to be the start of a larger effort and an active community within, outside, and across LAM organizations into the future.”

The Planning Committee was made up of Casey E. Davis Kaufman, Associate Director of the WGBH Media Library and Archives and Project Manager at the American Archive of Public Broadcasting and co-founder of ProjectARCC: Archivists Responding to Climate Change; Madeleine Charney, Sustainability Studies Librarian at UMass Amherst and co-founder of the Sustainability Round Table of the American Library Association; and Rory Litwin, former librarian and the founder of Litwin Books, LLC (Colloquium sponsor). Howard Besser, professor of Cinema Studies at NYU, hosted the Colloquium.

The LAAC 2017 website provides presenter bios and abstracts
http://litwinbooks.com/laac2017colloq.php
A recording of the event’s Livestream can be found on the Facebook page
https://www.facebook.com/events/638779516326338/
Twitter handle #LAAC17

Videotapes of sessions, slides, selective papers and the Twitter feed will soon be accessible through the University of Massachusetts Amherst Libraries Special Collections & University Archives in CREDO, their digital collection
http://credo.library.umass.edu/

Plans are underway for LAAC 2019. For more information, contact Rory Litwin rory@litwinbooks.com.

###

May 27, 2017

ALA Annual Conference in Chicago

We are looking forward to the ALA Annual Conference in Chicago, where we will be exhibiting as usual. The full catalog of books from Library Juice Press will be there, as well as materials related to Library Juice Academy. We look forward to meeting our customers and potential customers, answering questions, and talking about ideas. Find us in the exhibits hall at table 2636.

May 7, 2017

New: Library Juice Events Calendar

You can add this to your Google Calendar by clicking the plus-sign at the bottom. The calendar includes all events we are sponsoring or participating in: our colloquia, conferences we attend, webinars we put on, and the start of each month’s classes.