August 4, 2017

CFP: 2017 OK-ACRL Conference: “Critical Librarianship” theme

Dear colleagues-

Information is not neutral. The concept of “authority” includes innate bias toward people with privilege. The cultural, socioeconomic, and racial backgrounds of students have an effect on the way they seek information. Access to information is a human rights issue.

These are all examples of ideas that fall under the umbrella of “Critical Librarianship.” (http://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/keeping_up_with/critlib) How are you applying these ideas in your library? Where do you see a need for critlib at your institution? How can we serve our students more equitably? How can we increase diversity within the profession?

Brainstorm and submit a proposal to present at the 2017 OK-ACRL Conference. Proposals are due October 6th and presenters will be notified of acceptance by October 20th. Please contact Karl Siewert at siewert@nsuok.edu with any questions. The conference will be held on the Oklahoma State University Tulsa campus on November 10, 2017.


Karl G. Siewert, MLIS
Instructor and Reference Librarian – NSU-BA
Tulsa, OK

July 23, 2017

CFP: Ethical Questions in Name Authority Control

Call for chapter proposals
Working Title: Ethical Questions in Name Authority Control
Editor: Jane Sandberg
Submission Deadline: October 20, 2017
Publisher: Library Juice Press

Book description
Catalogers hold very specific types of power when they describe people, families, and corporate bodies. When creating a personal name authority record, for example, catalogers determine the authorized name by which an individual will be known, then identify a few characteristics of the individual that distinguish them from others, while balancing their judgment with respect for the individual’s self-concept. This is a powerful position, and that power must be exercised ethically.

As name authority control moves toward an identity management model, catalogers are taking on new roles, authority data is used in innovative ways, and libraries increasingly interact with non-library datasets and name disambiguation algorithms. During this transition, it is imperative that the library community reflect on the ethical questions that arise from its historical and emerging practices.

The present volume raises many of these questions in the hope of building toward a framework for the ethical practice of name authority control. This framework would include — at minimum — the following concepts:
* Respect for the people described in authority systems, including deceased people
* Fulfillment of name authority control objectives for names from a variety of cultural naming traditions and personal histories
* Local community needs
* Acknowledgment of historical and contemporary injustices
* Consideration of potential future uses of authority data
* Ethical employment practices

This collection will explore and develop this framework through theoretical and practice-based essays, stories, content analyses, and other methods. As it explores ethical questions in a variety of settings, this book will deepen readers’ understanding of names, identities, and library catalogs. The chapters from this volume are intended to spark conversations among librarians, archivists, library technologists, library administrators, and library and information science students.

Possible topics
Possible topics include but are not limited to the following:
* Ethical dimensions of an identity management approach to authority control (e.g. how should catalogers approach linking to flawed name authority data?)
* Responses to the PCC Ad Hoc Task Group on Gender in Name Authority Records recommendations
* Representations of people with Arabic, CJK, and Indigenous names in Google Scholar, ISNI, ORCID, Scopus, and online repositories
* Applying contemporary gender and demographic terms to non-contemporary people
* Describing people using demographic terms taken from thesauri other than LCSH or LC Demographic Group Terms (e.g. First Nations House of Learning thesaurus, Homosaurus)
* Barriers (technological, structural, etc.) to ethical name authority control
* Assumptions and flaws in name disambiguation and clustering algorithms
* Author privacy concerns
* Online name authority files in the context of right-to-be-forgotten laws
* Decolonizing name authority files
* Ethical dimensions of corporate and family name authority control
* Creating authority data in conjunction with the people and groups they describe
* Emotional labor in name authority work
* Connections between hiring and employment practices and name authority work
* Ethical name authority questions in consortial environments
* Effective advocacy for ethical name authority control and identity management practices

Timeline
Abstract submission deadline: October 20, 2017
Notification/Feedback regarding submission: December 1, 2017
First drafts due: April 13, 2018
Final drafts due: June 8, 2018
Final manuscript due to publisher: July, 2018

Submissions
Please email abstracts of up to 500 words to sandbej [at] linnbenton [dot] edu.

Abstracts should briefly describe your topic and how your chapter will help to build a framework of ethical name authority control practice. You are welcome to submit multiple abstracts about different possible topics. If your submission is tentatively accepted, the editor may request modifications. Material cannot be previously published.

Final chapters will be in the 2000-5000 word range. The volume will contain perspectives from a range of NACO and non-NACO libraries. Abstracts that explore the ethical dimensions of name authority work in tribal libraries, HBCUs, Hispanic-serving institutions, community colleges, public libraries, archives, school libraries, special libraries, and libraries outside the United States are particularly encouraged.

Please direct any questions to Jane Sandberg (sandbej [at] linnbenton [dot] edu).

About the Editor
Jane Sandberg received her MLIS from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is the Electronic Resources Librarian at Linn-Benton Community College in Albany, Oregon, where she coordinates library cataloging and systems. Her research interests include linked data approaches to name authority control, queer and trans local histories, open source software in rural communities, and historical dimensions of online transgender activism.

July 2, 2017

Library Juice Grants and Awards

The Library Juice Press Annual Paper Contest
Rewarding good work in the field of library and information studies, humanistically understood, through a monetary award and public recognition. Criteria for judgment are clarity of writing; originality of thought; sincerity of effort at reaching something true; soundness of argumentation (where applicable); and relevance to our time and situation.

The Litwin Books Award for Ongoing Doctoral Dissertation Research in the Philosophy of Information
An award that consists of $1,000, given annually to a graduate student who is working on a dissertation on the philosophy of information (broadly construed). As we see it, the range of philosophical questions relating to information is broad, and approachable through a variety of philosophical traditions (philosophy of mind, logic, philosophy of information so-called, philosophy of science, etc.).

The Litwin Books Travel Grant
Litwin Books provides financial support to scholars in LIS and related fields for travel to conferences they attend, domestically or internationally. Travel grants are limited to $500 for domestic conferences and $1000 for travel to a conference outside the recipient’s home country.

The ACRL ULS Outstanding Professional Development Award
Sponsored by Library Juice Academy, this award is intended to recognize librarians, archivists or curators whose contributions to providing professional development opportunities for librarians have been especially noteworthy or influential. The effect of these contributions may be the result of continuous or distinguished service to the profession, but may also be the result of extraordinarily active, innovative or collaborative work that deserves national recognition.

The Library Juice + DLF Forum Fellowship
This is a fellowship and travel award meant to support one mid-career professional in digital libraries and related fields. These fellowships are designed to offset travel and lodging expenses associated with attending the Forum. Library Juice+DLF Forum fellows additionally receive complimentary full registration to the Forum (up to a $750 value) and an invitation to special networking events.

June 9, 2017

Library Juice Press Annual Paper Contest

The intention of this contest is to encourage and reward good work in the field of library and information studies, humanistically understood, through a monetary award and public recognition.

The contest is open to librarians, library students, academics, and others.

Acceptable paper topics cover the full range of topics in the field of library and information studies, loosely defined.

Papers submitted may be pending publication or published (formally or informally) in the past year. Unpublished papers are acceptable if they are publicly accessible (informally published) and written in the past year.

Single and multiple-authored papers will be accepted.

Any type of paper may be entered as long as it is not a report of an empirical study. Examples of accepted forms would be literature review essays, analytical essays, historical papers, and personal essays. The work may include some informal primary research, but may not be essentially a report of a study.

Submitted papers may be part of a larger project.

The minimum length is 2000 words. The maximum length is 10,000 words.

Criteria for judgment:
Clarity of writing
Originality of thought
Sincerity of effort at reaching something true
Soundness of argumentation (where applicable)
Relevance to our time and situation

The award shall consist of $1000 and a certificate suitable for framing.

Entries must be submitted by August 1st, to inquiries@libraryjuicepress.com. Entries must be in MS Word or RTF format to facilitate removal of identifying information (PDFs not accepted).

The winning paper, and possibly a number of honorable mentions, are announced on October 1st.

Papers will be judged by a committee selected for their accomplishments in the field, and in order to represent a range of perspectives. The jury uses a blind process in which identifying information is removed from the submitted papers.

Although we are a publisher, submission of a paper for this award in itself does not imply any transfer, licensing, or sharing of your publication rights.

Past winners
2016 – Lisa Sloniowski, for “Affective Labor, Resistance, and the Academic Librarian,” published in Library Trends in 2016.
2015 – James Lowry, for “Information and the Social Contract,” unpublished at the time of award.
2014 – Michelle Caswell, for “Inventing New Archival Imaginaries: Theoretical Foundations for Identity-Based Community Archives,” published as a chapter in Identity Palimpsests: Archiving Ethnicity in the United States and Canada, Litwin Books, 2014.
2013 – Ryan Shaw, for “Information Organization and the Philosophy of History,” published in JASIST in June 2013.

May 31, 2017

ALISE Historical Perspectives Special Interest Group (SIG) Call for Papers

ALISE 2018, Denver, CO, February 6-9, 2018

Historical Perspectives Special Interest Group (SIG) Call for Papers

DEADLINE: July 15, 2017

The ALISE Historical Perspectives SIG invites the submission of abstracts for a panel at the 2018 conference in Denver:

Over the years, library historian Wayne Weigand has called our attention to three core professional values: reading, place, and users as the focus for our understanding of libraries. Primary sources inform his vision of librarianship as a field which should prioritize these three facets in order to serve diverse communities.

The 2018 ALISE Historical Perspectives SIG seeks papers to constitute a panel that will critically engage these powerful, evidence-based, and elegant conceptual tools. Specifically, we seek papers that examine the degree to which these framing themes inform LIS education and how they might apply to histories of all types of libraries in the United States and abroad.

Abstracts should be no more than 250 words, though a select number of references can be supplied in addition to this word limit. Send queries and abstracts to SIG co-conveners Jennifer Burek Pierce (jennifer-burek-pierce@uiowa.edu) and Anthony Bernier (anthony.bernier@sjsu.edu) by July 15, 2017.

March 24, 2017

CFP extended: Libraries and Archives in the Anthropocene Colloquium

The Planning Committee for Libraries and Archives in the Anthropocene: A Colloquium is seeking an additional four lightning talk proposals (5 minutes each) and two paper presentations (20 minutes each), which will take place on May 13-14, 2017 at New York University.

Please submit proposals here: https://goo.gl/forms/dEX38aB3WrdhgYq92

Deadline: April 3, 2017 (presenters informed by April 7th).

Note: Presenters must pay the registration fee of $75 to attend.

Original Call for Proposals:

Call for Proposals:
Libraries and Archives in the Anthropocene: A Colloquium
May 13-14, 2017
New York University

As stewards of a culture’s collective knowledge, libraries and archives are facing the realities of cataclysmic environmental change with a dawning awareness of its unique implications for their missions and activities. Some professionals in these fields are focusing new energies on the need for environmentally sustainable practices in their institutions. Some are prioritizing the role of libraries and archives in supporting climate change communication and influencing government policy and public awareness. Others foresee an inevitable unraveling of systems and ponder the new place of libraries and archives in a world much different from the one we take for granted. Climate disruption, peak oil, toxic waste, deforestation, soil salinity and agricultural crisis, depletion of groundwater and other natural resources, loss of biodiversity, mass migration, sea level rise, and extreme weather events are all problems that threaten indirectly to overwhelm civilization’s knowledge infrastructures, and present information institutions with unprecedented challenges.

This colloquium will serve as a space to explore these challenges and establish directions for future efforts and investigations. We invite proposals from academics, librarians, archivists, activists, and others.

Some suggested topics and questions:
– How can information institutions operate more sustainably?
– How can information institutions better serve the needs of policy discussions and public awareness in the area of climate change and other threats to the environment?
– How can information institutions support skillsets and technologies that are relevant following systemic unraveling?
– What will information work look like without the infrastructures we take for granted?
– How does information literacy instruction intersect with ecoliteracy?
– How can information professionals support radical environmental activism?
– What are the implications of climate change for disaster preparedness?
– What role do information workers have in addressing issues of environmental justice?
– What are the implications of climate change for preservation practices?
– Should we question the wisdom of preserving access to the technological cultural legacy that has led to the crisis?
– Is there a new responsibility to document, as a mode of bearing witness, the historical event of society’s confrontation with the systemic threat of climate change, peak oil, and other environmental problems?
– Given the ideological foundations of libraries and archives in Enlightenment thought, and given that Enlightenment civilization may be leading to its own environmental endpoint, are these ideological foundations called into question? And with what consequences?

Planning committee:
Casey E. Davis Kaufman, WGBH, ProjectARCC
Madeleine Charney, UMass Amherst Libraries, ALA SustainRT
Rory Litwin, Litwin Books, LLC

January 27, 2017

Call for Essays: We Can Do I.T. : Women in Library Information Technology

Call for Essays

Working Title: We Can Do I.T. : Women in Library Information Technology
Editors: Jenny Brandon, Sharon Ladenson, Kelly Sattler
Submission Deadline: March 27, 2017 (extended)
Publisher: Library Juice Press

Description of book:
What roles are women playing in information technology (I.T.) in libraries? What are rewards that women experience, as well as challenges they face in library I.T.? What are future visions for women in library I.T.?

This edited collection will provide a voice for people to share insights into the culture, challenges, and rewards of being a woman working in library I.T. We are soliciting personal narratives from anyone who works in a library about what it is like to be a woman, or working with women, in library I.T. We also seek essays on visions for the future of women within library I.T. and how such visions could be achieved. This collection should be useful not only for those pursuing a career in library I.T., but also for library managers seeking to facilitate a more inclusive environment for the future. Through publishing a collection of personal narratives, we also seek to bring experiences of women in library I.T. from the margins to the center.

For the purposes of this collection, we consider library I.T. to include responsibilities in computer networks, hardware, and software support; computer programming (e.g. coding in python, php, java…); web development (e.g. admins, coders, front/back end developers,…); and/or the management of such areas.

Possible topics include but are not limited to the following:
– How you started in library I.T.
– Stories related to being a woman in library I.T.
– Experiences of acceptance or resistance within the library I.T. community
– Tips and advice for other women seeking a career in library I.T.
– Changes in your career path because of entering library I.T.
– Changes you’d like to see happen within the library I.T. culture
– Advice for library management on how to improve library I.T. culture
– A vision for the future about/for women in library I.T.

Timeline:
Submission deadline: March 13, 2017
Notification/Feedback regarding submission: May 12, 2017
Editing and revision: June – July 2017
Final manuscript due to publisher: September 2017

Submissions:
This volume will contain commentary, stories, and essays (from 140 characters to 1,500 words).
If your submission is tentatively accepted, we may request modifications.
Material cannot be previously published.
To submit your essay, please fill out this Google form: https://goo.gl/forms/6oE82aFe7atFlP6j1
For questions, email womenlibit@googlegroups.com

About the Editors:

Kelly Sattler has a degree in computer engineering and spent 12 years in corporate I.T. before earning her MLIS degree from University of Illinois-Urbana/Champaign. Currently, she is the Head of Web Services at Michigan State University Libraries.

Jenny Brandon earned a BA in interdisciplinary humanities at Michigan State University, and an MLIS from Wayne State University. She is a self-taught web designer/front end developer, and is currently employed in Web Services at Michigan State University. She is also a reference librarian.

Sharon Ladenson is Gender and Communication Studies Librarian at Michigan State University. Her writing on feminist pedagogy and critical information literacy is included in works such as Critical Library Instruction: Theories and Methods (from Library Juice Press) and the Critical Library Pedagogy Handbook (from the Association of College and Research Libraries). She is an active member of the Women and Gender Studies Section (WGSS) of the Association of College and Research Libraries, and has presented with WGSS colleagues at the National Women’s Studies Association Annual Conference.

January 10, 2017

CFP: Libraries and Nonprofits: Collaboration for the Public Good

About the Book

Libraries and Nonprofits: Collaboration for the Public Good (Library Juice Press) will consider the range of partnerships entered into by all types of libraries and nonprofits and will provide resources and best practices for nurturing these collaborations. We are seeking domestic and international case studies which highlight successful (or problematic) collaborations between libraries and nonprofit organizations for inclusion in the book. Case studies may address the following themes relating to nonprofit organizations and library collaborations including (but not limited to):

* civic engagement
* public health
* social safety nets/social work
* arts and culture
* education/literacy
* environment/sustainability/food justice
* LGBTQIA
* anti-racism
* disability rights
* legal aid/human rights
* housing/planning

Examples range from collaborations with financial literacy organizations to provide free or low-cost tax preparation; legal aid organizations to provide civic education and human rights workshops; literacy organizations to provide storytime programs, ESL or tutoring services; or museums to provide exhibitions, pop-up galleries, or STEAM programming.

How to Participate

Authors are invited to submit a case study proposal as an email attachment in Word or PDF to librariesandnonprofits@gmail.com on or before Monday, February 20, 2017. The case study proposal should be 300-500 words (Chicago Style) clearly explaining the intent and details of the proposed case study as it relates to the topics listed above. Proposed case studies should be based on unpublished work, unique to this publication and not submitted or intended to be simultaneously submitted elsewhere.

Authors will be notified by Monday, March 27, 2017 about the status of their proposals and sent case study guidelines. Completed case studies are expected to be between 2,000-4,000 words, although shorter or longer case studies are negotiable. Full case studies are expected to be submitted by Monday, June 26, 2017.

Proposals should include

* Author name(s), institutional or organizational affiliation, job title/role
* Brief author(s) bio
* Proposed case study title
* A summary of the proposed case study (300-500 words)

About the authors

Tatiana Bryant, Special Collections Librarian, University of Oregon Libraries

Jonathan O. Cain, Librarian for Data Initiatives and Public Policy, Planning and Management, University of Oregon Libraries

CFP: Libraries: Culture, History, and Society

Libraries: Culture, History, and Society is now accepting submissions for our second issue, to be published in Fall 2017. A semiannual peer-reviewed publication from the Library History Round Table of the American Library Association and the Penn State University Press, LCHS will be available in print and online via JSTOR and Project Muse.

The only journal in the United States devoted to library history, LCHS positions library history as its own field of scholarship, while promoting innovative cross-disciplinary research on libraries’ relationships with their unique environments. LCHS brings together scholars from many disciplines to examine the history of libraries as institutions, collections, and services, as well as the experiences of library workers and users. There are no limits of time and space, and libraries of every type are included (private, public, corporate, and academic libraries, and special collections). In addition to Library Science, the journal welcomes contributors from History, English, Literary Studies, Sociology, Education, Gender/Women’s Studies, Race/Ethnic Studies, Philosophy, Political Science, Architecture, Anthropology, Geography, Economics, and other disciplines.

Submissions for volume 1, issue 2, are due February 24, 2017. Manuscripts must be submitted electronically through LCHS’s Editorial Manager system at http://www.editorialmanager.com/LCHS/default.aspx. They must also conform to the instructions for authors at http://bit.ly/LCHScfp1. New scholars, and authors whose work is in the “idea” stage, are welcomed to contact the editors if they would like guidance prior to submission.

We are excited to see this journal become a reality. We welcome your thoughts as we establish a platform for studying libraries within their broader humanistic and social contexts.

For further questions, please contact the editors:
Bernadette Lear, BAL19@psu.edu
Eric Novotny, ECN1@psu.edu

December 19, 2016

Extended deadline for CFP: CAPAL17: Foundations & Futures: Critical Reflections on the Pasts, Presents, and Possibilities of Academic Librarianship

CFP: Call for Proposals

CAPAL17: Foundations & Futures: Critical Reflections on the Pasts, Presents, and Possibilities of Academic Librarianship

CAPAL/ACBAP Annual Meeting – May 30 – June 1, 2017

Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences 2017
Ryerson University
Toronto, Ontario

The Canadian Association of Professional Academic Librarians (CAPAL) invites you to participate in its annual conference, to be held as part of the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences 2017 in Toronto, Ontario, which lies in the territory of the Haudenosaunee and the Mississaugas of the New Credit River. This conference offers librarians and allied professionals across all disciplines an alternative space to share research and scholarship, challenge current thinking about professional issues, and forge new relationships.

Theme

In keeping with the Congress 2017 theme, From Far and Wide: The Next 150, our focus is CAPAL17: Foundations & Futures: Critical Reflections on the Pasts, Presents, and Possibilities of Academic Librarianship.

This conference provides an opportunity for the academic library community to critically examine and discuss together the ways in which our profession is influenced by its social, political, and economic environments. By considering academic librarianship within its historical contexts, its presents, and its possible futures, and by situating it within evolving cultural frameworks and structures of power, we can better understand the ways in which academic librarianship may reflect, reinforce, or challenge these contexts both positively and negatively.

How can “recalling, retelling, and scrutinizing” our stories help us to understand the present and envision the future of academic librarianship? What are the logics and practices that constitute and reconstitute our profession, and inform our assumptions and approaches?

This conference engages with current discussions surrounding what many consider to be a significant juncture in academic librarianship: the turn towards critically examining the contexts and roots of our profession. How for instance, do we as a profession integrate understanding of the pasts and presents of broader social contexts and engage meaningfully in these necessary conversations?

Potential Topics:

Papers presented might relate to aspects of the following themes (though they need not be limited to them):
– Critical reflections on librarian identity, agency, and representation (in areas such as gender, sexuality, race, decolonization/indigenization, professionalism, stereotypes)
– Critical reflections on core values: intellectual and academic freedom, access to information, privacy of information, preservation and curation, professionalism, etc.
– Bringing the oppositional practices of broader social mobilization around movements (e.g., Black Lives Matter, Idle No More, transgender rights, and others) to bear on our work
– Critical librarianship in practice: collections development and management, information literacy, reference services, and other areas of service (e.g., cultural bias in knowledge organization; absent histories, etc.)
– Critical reflections on career paths (e.g., early-career professionals, new and emerging roles, specializations, management, leadership, etc.)
– Unpacking of language, rhetoric, and discourse that influence and constitute our profession and services (e.g., buzzwords, military or business speak, oppositional discourses of past/future, print/digital, progressive/obsolete, etc.)
– Modes of knowledge creation, research dissemination, and engagement (e.g., oral traditions, co-creation, copyright, open access, and other forms of scholarly communication, etc.)
– Critical review of current educational requirements and training for academic librarians

The Program Committee invites proposals for individual papers as well as proposals for panel submissions of three papers. Proposed papers must be original and not have been published elsewhere.

Individual papers are typically 20 minutes in length. For individual papers, please submit an abstract of no more than 400 words and a presentation title, with a brief biographical statement and your contact information.

For complete panels, please submit a panel abstract of no more than 400 words as well as a list of all participants and brief biographical statements, and a separate abstract of no more than 400 words for each presenter. Please identify and provide participants’ contact information for the panel organizer.

Please feel free to contact the Program Committee to discuss a topic for a paper, panel, or other session format. Proposals should be emailed as an attachment as a .doc or .docx file, using the following filename conventions:
Lastname_Keywordoftopic.docx

Proposals and questions should be directed to the Program Chair, Courtney Waugh at cwaugh5@uwo.ca

Extended deadline for Proposals: the 3rd of January, 2017

Further information about the conference, as well as Congress 2017 more broadly, will be available soon.

November 14, 2016

CFP: CAPAL17: Foundations & Futures: Critical Reflections on the Pasts, Presents, and Possibilities of Academic Librarianship

CFP: Call for Proposals

CAPAL17: Foundations & Futures: Critical Reflections on the Pasts, Presents, and Possibilities of Academic Librarianship

CAPAL/ACBAP Annual Meeting – May 30 – June 1, 2017

Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences 2017

Ryerson University

Toronto, Ontario

The Canadian Association of Professional Academic Librarians (CAPAL) invites you to participate in its annual conference, to be held as part of the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences 2017 in Toronto, Ontario, which lies in the territory of the Haudenosaunee and the Mississaugas of the New Credit River. This conference offers librarians and allied professionals across all disciplines an alternative space to share research and scholarship, challenge current thinking about professional issues, and forge new relationships.

Theme

In keeping with the Congress 2017 theme, From Far and Wide: The Next 150, our focus is CAPAL17: Foundations & Futures: Critical Reflections on the Pasts, Presents, and Possibilities of Academic Librarianship.

This conference provides an opportunity for the academic library community to critically examine and discuss together the ways in which our profession is influenced by its social, political, and economic environments. By considering academic librarianship within its historical contexts, its presents, and its possible futures, and by situating it within evolving cultural frameworks and structures of power, we can better understand the ways in which academic librarianship may reflect, reinforce, or challenge these contexts both positively and negatively.

How can “recalling, retelling, and scrutinizing” our stories help us to understand the present and envision the future of academic librarianship? What are the logics and practices that constitute and reconstitute our profession, and inform our assumptions and approaches?

This conference engages with current discussions surrounding what many consider to be a significant juncture in academic librarianship: the turn towards critically examining the contexts and roots of our profession. How for instance, do we as a profession integrate understanding of the pasts and presents of broader social contexts and engage meaningfully in these necessary conversations?

Potential Topics:

Papers presented might relate to aspects of the following themes (though they need not be limited to them):

– Critical reflections on librarian identity, agency, and representation (in areas such as gender, sexuality, race, decolonization/indigenization, professionalism, stereotypes)
– Critical reflections on core values: intellectual and academic freedom, access to information, privacy of information, preservation and curation, professionalism, etc.
– Bringing the oppositional practices of broader social mobilization around movements (e.g., Black Lives Matter, Idle No More, transgender rights, and others) to bear on our work
– Critical librarianship in practice: collections development and management, information literacy, reference services, and other areas of service (e.g., cultural bias in knowledge organization; absent histories, etc.)
– Critical reflections on career paths (e.g., early-career professionals, new and emerging roles, specializations, management, leadership, etc.)
– Unpacking of language, rhetoric, and discourse that influence and constitute our profession and services (e.g., buzzwords, military or business speak, oppositional discourses of past/future, print/digital, progressive/obsolete, etc.)
– Modes of knowledge creation, research dissemination, and engagement (e.g., oral traditions, co-creation, copyright, open access, and other forms of scholarly communication, etc.)
– Critical review of current educational requirements and training for academic librarians

The Program Committee invites proposals for individual papers as well as proposals for panel submissions of three papers. Proposed papers must be original and not have been published elsewhere.

Individual papers are typically 20 minutes in length. For individual papers, please submit an abstract of no more than 400 words and a presentation title, with a brief biographical statement and your contact information.

For complete panels, please submit a panel abstract of no more than 400 words as well as a list of all participants and brief biographical statements, and a separate abstract of no more than 400 words for each presenter. Please identify and provide participants’ contact information for the panel organizer.

Please feel free to contact the Program Committee to discuss a topic for a paper, panel, or other session format. Proposals should be emailed as an attachment as a .doc or .docx file, using the following filename conventions: Lastname_Keywordoftopic.docx

Proposals and questions should be directed to the Program Chair, Courtney Waugh at cwaugh5@uwo.ca

Deadline for Proposals is: the 23rd of December, 2016

Further information about the conference, as well as Congress 2017 more broadly, will be available soon.

October 21, 2016

CFP: Information Ethics Roundtable 2017

Call for Proposals

Data & Ethics

Information Ethics Roundtable 2017
April 21-22

Proposals Due: January 2, 2017
Notification of Acceptance: January 30, 2017

https://ier2017.wordpress.com

In our knowledge society, our networked selves continually create and are created through data. In light of the ubiquity of data in the contemporary world, the ethical creation, dissemination, use, and storage of data continues to be an area of concern. The focus of the 2017 roundtable will be on all aspects of data (writ large) and ethics.

The Information Ethics Roundtable is a yearly conference which brings together researchers from disciplines such as philosophy, information science, communications, public administration, anthropology and law to discuss ethical issues such as information privacy, intellectual property, intellectual freedom, and censorship.

Suggested areas of inquiry include, but are not limited to:
• The primacy of data over the individual
• Reinforcement of personal preferences through surveillance of personal data
• Responsibilities and ethical obligations for data curation and sharing
• Privacy and surveillance (including the NSA disclosures)
• “Big Data” research and the ethical treatment of human subjects
• Moral implications of the Quantified Self
• Ethics in data science instruction/pedagogy
• Social justice and data collection

We invite both individual and group proposals:

(1) For individual paper proposals, please submit a 500-word abstract of your paper.

(2) For panel, fishbowl, or group proposals, please identify participants with a 100-250 word biography and submit a 1500 word abstract of your topic and treatment.

Proposals should be sent to ier2017-ischool@illinois.edu.

Deadline for Proposals: January 2nd, 2017

Notification of Acceptance: Monday, January 30, 2017

Conference Dates: April 21-22, 2016

Conference Organizing Committee:

Emily J.M. Knox, Assistant Professor, University of Illinois
Emily Lawrence, Doctoral Student, University of Illinois
Shannon M. Oltmann, Assistant Professor, University of Kentucky
Allen Renear, Dean and Professor, University of Illinois

Sponsors:

School of Information Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign
Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities

University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Department of Philosophy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Illinois Informatics Institute

October 11, 2016

CFP: Urban Library Journal

Call for Papers

Urban Library Journal (ULJ) is an open access, double-blind peer-reviewed journal of research that addresses all aspects of urban libraries and librarianship.

Urban Library Journal invites submissions in broad areas such as public higher education, urban studies, multiculturalism, library and educational services to immigrants, preservation of public higher education, and universal access to World Wide Web resources. We welcome articles that focus on all forms of librarianship in an urban setting, whether that setting is an academic, research, public, school, or special library.

Possible topics may include, but are not limited to:

– Reference and instruction in diverse, multicultural urban settings
– Radical librarianship, social justice issues, and/or informed agitation
– Intentional design / “library as space” in an urban setting
– Physical and/or virtual accessibility issues
– Open education resources in urban systems
– Innovative collaboration between academic departments, other branches, or community partnerships

More!

Completed manuscript length should fall between 2,500 and 5,000 words. Full author guidelines can be found on the ULJ website: http://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/author_guidelines.html

The submission period is open now and closes on January 1st, 2017.

For more information about ULJ and to see the latest issue: http://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj.

August 29, 2016

CFP: Pushing the Margins: Women of Color and Intersectionality in LIS

CFP:
Pushing the Margins: Women of Color and Intersectionality in LIS

Editors: Rose L. Chou and Annie Pho

Literature on diversity in librarianship has mainly focused on recruitment and increasing numbers of librarians of color. This book shifts the focus beyond numbers and instead on the lived experiences of those who are underrepresented in our profession. Using intersectionality as a framework, this edited collection explores the experiences of women of color in libraries. With roots in black feminism and critical race theory, intersectionality studies the ways in which multiple social and cultural identities impact individual experience. Looking at race and gender isolated from each other fails to see the many dimensions in which they intersect and overlap, creating a complicated lived experience that cannot be captured by studying one identity.

Libraries and librarians idealistically portray themselves as egalitarian and neutral entities that provide information equally to everyone, yet the library as an institution often reflects and perpetuates societal racism, sexism, and additional forms of oppression. Women of color who work in libraries are often placed in the position of balancing the ideal of the library providing good customer service and being an unbiased environment with the lived reality of receiving microaggressions and other forms of harassment on a daily basis from both colleagues and patrons.
Typically these conversations and discussions of our experiences as women of color have happened behind closed doors, within trusted circles of friends. Our hope and intention is that by bringing these conversations into a public space, we will raise consciousness of these experiences and start changing perceptions and expectations.

Proposals may consider the following themes and questions:
– Invisible and emotional labor
– Intersections of multiple identities, such as sexuality, gender identity, and socioeconomic class
– Leadership, management, promotion, and authority
– Gender presentation and performance
– Treatment of women of color library workers who are either not in librarian positions or do not have a library degree
– Experiences of women of color as library patrons
– How identity affects approaches to collection development
– How does structural oppression reproduce itself in spaces that are touted to be egalitarian and democratic?
– How does one maintain respect in the library when confronted with oppressive treatment or being stereotyped based on one’s race, gender, or other social categories?
– How can library organizations create better work cultures and environments for staff and patrons to exist as their true selves?

This is not an exhaustive list. Proposals are welcome from anyone involved in libraries, archives, and information science. Contributions from people of color, those who belong to communities underrepresented in LIS, and those who work in school and public libraries are strongly encouraged. Essays that are straightforward scholarship are invited and welcome, as are more hybrid or creative approaches that incorporate scholarly writing with personal narrative, illustrations, graphics, or other strategies consistent with feminist and antiracist methodologies.

This collection will contain papers and essays of approximately 2000 – 5000 words. Proposals should include an abstract of no more than 500 words describing the proposed contribution and a short biographical statement. Send proposals to pushingthemargins@gmail.com by October 28, 2016.

Notifications will be sent by November 4, 2016. First drafts of manuscripts will be due May 31, 2017. Editing and revision will occur June-December 2017, with an anticipated publication date of Spring 2018.

This book is forthcoming in the Litwin Books/Library Juice Press Series on Critical Race Studies and Multiculturalism in LIS, Rose L. Chou and Annie Pho, series editors.

About the editors

Rose L. Chou is Budget Coordinator at the American University Library. She received her MLIS from San Jose State University and BA in Sociology from Boston College. Rose serves on the ARL/SAA Mosaic Program Advisory Group and is part of the LIS Microaggressions project team. Her research interests include race, gender, and social justice in LIS.

Annie Pho is Inquiry and Instruction Librarian for Peer-to-Peer Services and Public Programming at UCLA Libraries. She received her MLS from Indiana University-Indianapolis and BA in Art History from San Francisco State University. She’s on the editorial board of In the Library with a Lead Pipe, a co-moderator of the #critlib Twitter chat, and a Minnesota Institute for Early Career Librarians 2014 alumnus. Her research interests are in critical pedagogy, diversity, and student research behavior.

June 29, 2016

CFP: Human Operators: A Critical Oral History of Technology in Libraries

About the book

Human Operators: A Critical Oral History of Technology in Libraries will be a collective oral history covering many of the issues in technology in librarianship in the early 21st century. Via edited and compiled interview transcripts, readers will get to “hear” the voices of librarians and archivists discussing tech topics from perspectives that are critical, social justice-oriented, feminist, anti-racist, and ecologically-minded.

Objective

This readable, conversational book will bring out specific critiques of technology as well as more inspiring aspects of what’s going on in the instructional, open source, free culture, and maker worlds in the field. The book will be less about the technology per se and more about critical thinking around technology and how it actually works in people’s lives.

The stories that this book intends to capture may have been documented in blog posts, Twitter conversations, and academic articles, but this “oral history” will be an opportunity for them to live on in printed book form.

Target audiences

– Librarians and archivists who want to hear about use cases, organizational impacts, and generally how people (staff and library users alike) are affected by technology in libraries.
– Technologists who want to better understand how ideas are sparked, decisions are made, and hardware and software are deployed in libraries.
– Other readers who think about technology and society.

About the editor

Melissa Morrone is a librarian at Brooklyn Public Library and manages the Shelby White and Leon Levy Information Commons there. She is a non-technologist who has long been involved in technology (writing CMS documentation; developing and conducting training on her organization’s ILS, Internet filters, and digital privacy; giving online research workshops for activists; doing everyday public library reference and computer support) at work and elsewhere.

How to participate

Email informed.agitation@gmail.com by July 31, 2016, if you’re interested in setting up an online interview to discuss your work around one or more of the following topics:

– open source ILSs and other FOSS software
– library cataloging and automation
– ebooks, DRM, and related issues
– makerspaces and digital media labs
– privacy, security, and surveillance
– technology instruction and digital literacy
– digital humanities
– digital archives
– digital reader’s advisory
– continuing education, conference codes of conduct, and other professional activities

Bring your stories, your critical librarianship, and your sociopolitical analysis to technology in libraries, and let’s talk.