March 24, 2017

CFP extended: Libraries and Archives in the Anthropocene Colloquium

The Planning Committee for Libraries and Archives in the Anthropocene: A Colloquium is seeking an additional four lightning talk proposals (5 minutes each) and two paper presentations (20 minutes each), which will take place on May 13-14, 2017 at New York University.

Please submit proposals here: https://goo.gl/forms/dEX38aB3WrdhgYq92

Deadline: April 3, 2017 (presenters informed by April 7th).

Note: Presenters must pay the registration fee of $75 to attend.

Original Call for Proposals:

Call for Proposals:
Libraries and Archives in the Anthropocene: A Colloquium
May 13-14, 2017
New York University

As stewards of a culture’s collective knowledge, libraries and archives are facing the realities of cataclysmic environmental change with a dawning awareness of its unique implications for their missions and activities. Some professionals in these fields are focusing new energies on the need for environmentally sustainable practices in their institutions. Some are prioritizing the role of libraries and archives in supporting climate change communication and influencing government policy and public awareness. Others foresee an inevitable unraveling of systems and ponder the new place of libraries and archives in a world much different from the one we take for granted. Climate disruption, peak oil, toxic waste, deforestation, soil salinity and agricultural crisis, depletion of groundwater and other natural resources, loss of biodiversity, mass migration, sea level rise, and extreme weather events are all problems that threaten indirectly to overwhelm civilization’s knowledge infrastructures, and present information institutions with unprecedented challenges.

This colloquium will serve as a space to explore these challenges and establish directions for future efforts and investigations. We invite proposals from academics, librarians, archivists, activists, and others.

Some suggested topics and questions:
– How can information institutions operate more sustainably?
– How can information institutions better serve the needs of policy discussions and public awareness in the area of climate change and other threats to the environment?
– How can information institutions support skillsets and technologies that are relevant following systemic unraveling?
– What will information work look like without the infrastructures we take for granted?
– How does information literacy instruction intersect with ecoliteracy?
– How can information professionals support radical environmental activism?
– What are the implications of climate change for disaster preparedness?
– What role do information workers have in addressing issues of environmental justice?
– What are the implications of climate change for preservation practices?
– Should we question the wisdom of preserving access to the technological cultural legacy that has led to the crisis?
– Is there a new responsibility to document, as a mode of bearing witness, the historical event of society’s confrontation with the systemic threat of climate change, peak oil, and other environmental problems?
– Given the ideological foundations of libraries and archives in Enlightenment thought, and given that Enlightenment civilization may be leading to its own environmental endpoint, are these ideological foundations called into question? And with what consequences?

Planning committee:
Casey E. Davis Kaufman, WGBH, ProjectARCC
Madeleine Charney, UMass Amherst Libraries, ALA SustainRT
Rory Litwin, Litwin Books, LLC

March 11, 2017

Librarians’ knowledge and attitudes about print-on-demand: an informal study

Print-on-demand printing, or POD, is a technology that allows publishers and individuals to have books printed one-at-a-time, instead of doing a whole print run of hundreds or thousands of copies at a time. The per-unit cost is higher, but there can be a savings in not having to deal with warehousing a large inventory or dealing with remainders. POD has ushered in a new era of self-publishing, so many people associate it with self-published books exclusively. It has also allowed small companies to make money by printing a large catalog of out-of-copyright classics from Project Gutenberg. I noticed recently that some catalogers on the AUTOCAT list used the term POD interchangeably with this kind of publishing, which I knew to be a misunderstanding of how the technology is currently used in the publishing industry. I think it is important for librarians to understand how POD is being used, for reasons that I will get into, so I decided to do a study to test librarians’ knowledge of POD. I designed a survey to find out what librarians think about POD, how knowledge that a book is POD would affect their treatment of books that are printed this way, and how they believe they can tell if a book is POD when they encounter it. I ran the survey and have some results that I will share here. It was an informal survey, and I am not using the kind of statistical techniques that you would find in an academic journal article, but I think the implications of the study turned out to be very clear nevertheless. In this report, I will say a bit about my methods and share some numbers.

First, some facts about POD in today’s publishing industry:
– Traditional publishers are now using POD publishing to maintain a large backlist, to economically publish academic titles that are expected to have low sales figures, and to deal with sudden spikes in demand.
– Inks, paper, and binding have improved to the point where POD paperbacks are superior in quality to paperbacks printed traditionally a few decades ago, and are not easily discernable from traditionally-printed books by their physical attributes.
– Since traditional publishers are using POD, POD books are often professionally designed and edited. The printing method doesn’t necessarily imply anything about the content of the book.
– POD books are not necessarily hard to catalog, if they come from a traditional publisher. Catalog records are readily available, often from the Library of Congress’ CIP program. Although the CIP program is not intended for POD books, some publishers ignore this, and many academic publishers will do an initial print run and switch to POD when demand has subsided, without calling it a new edition.
– Ordering systems such as GOBI, Title Source 360, and Oasis often do not show any indication that a book is POD. To be sure of this, I tested three titles I know to be POD, one from the University of Georgia Press and two from Library Juice Press. In all three ordering systems, the University of Georgia Press title was not identified as POD. In the case of the two Library Juice Press titles, one title was indicated as POD in one of the three ordering systems but not the other two, and one title was missing from one of the ordering systems and not identified as POD in the other two. (The ISBNs for these titles are 978-0-8203-3891-0, 978-1-63400-021-5, and 978-1-936117-01-7.)

I had a conversation with the director of the University of Georgia Press, Lisa Bayer, about their use of POD publishing. Lisa had the following to say about POD:

“Most if not all university presses are using POD for their monographs and trade paperbacks. It’s very widespread and allows us to manage our inventory investment. We use the POD programs at Lightning Source (Ingram), Baker & Taylor, and Amazon… We certainly don’t do our illustrated art books or jacketed hardcovers in POD. It’s best for paperbacks and printed case library editions. The quality has improved tremendously in the past few years. I’m not aware of vendors designating POD editions; one of the benefits of putting a title into the system is that it is always ‘available.'”

As I mentioned, I noticed that in discussions on the AUTOCAT list some librarians did not seem to be aware of these facts, and as you will see from the numbers, my survey bore out this impression. Some details on the survey:

I asked five questions; two were demographic and three were designed to gauge librarians knowledge and opinions about POD, as well as their ideas about how to identify POD titles. The demographic questions were to find out what kind of a library the respondent was from and what kind of position they held in their libraries. The other questions asked for some words they associated with POD, how knowledge that a book is POD would affect their treatment of it in their jobs, and how they know a book is POD if they think they know that it is. The questions that asked for words that they associate with POD and how POD status would affect their treatment of a book revealed value judgments, while the question about how they know if a book is POD revealed whether they were knowledgable about POD or clearly held misconceptions.

Since this was an informal study that did not pretend to have the rigor of scholarly research, I went ahead and coded these responses myself, without worrying about such issues as intercoder reliability and the like. A future study on this could use more rigorous methods.

In total, there were 408 responses. 27 respondents stated that they did not have knowledge of POD and couldn’t answer the questions. 37 gave responses that were too difficult to understand to use in the study. 32 respondents understood the notion of POD in a different way, interpreting it as a service offered by the library. While not incorrect, that is a different understanding of the term POD than I was intending to study, so I disregarded those responses. So, of the 408 responses, 312 were from people who had clear ideas about POD (whether or not they gave opinions about it). Of those 312 people, 271 showed in their answers that they held mistaken ideas about POD and how it is used in the industry, while 40 understood POD more or less correctly. That means that 87% of librarians surveyed have incorrect ideas about POD. That is a strong result, and somewhat disturbing, as it has implications, in some cases, for how librarians do their jobs.

I also coded responses to see whether respondents viewed POD positively, negatively, or neutrally. Of the 312 otherwise usable responses, for 40 of them I couldn’t really tell how they felt about POD, leaving 272 usable responses. Of 272 usable responses to these questions, 198 librarians viewed POD negatively (73%), 12 viewed it positively (4%), and 62 viewed it neutrally (23%). I counted responses as neutral if they indicated that a book’s status as POD would not affect their treatment of it in the context of their work.

In terms of comparing librarians in different settings, the demographic questions didn’t reveal much. The data on the work role of the respondents was not usable, because such a high number of librarians worked in more than one role, and the combination of roles didn’t follow a strong pattern. The data on type of library showed that the majority of respondents were in academic libraries. A comparison across library types showed no real difference as far as their understanding. Of the 408 responses, 234 were from academic libraries (170 usable); 103 were from public libraries (86 usable) and 64 (55 usable) were from a mix of other types of libraries and institutions (school, corporate, government, non-profit, consortia, vendors, and LIS programs). This is good for the study, from my point of view, because it is primarily in academic publishing where traditional publishers are using POD.

So the data from this survey show that librarians mostly have an inaccurate understanding of POD, as well as viewing it negatively in a way that affects their treatment of POD books in their job roles. Let’s look a little more closely at the responses themselves to see what we can learn, since the questions were open-ended. Bearing out my initial impression from discussions on the AUTOCAT list, most librarians associate POD books with self-publishing and reprints of out-of-copyright works, and they also think that the signs indicating that a book is self-published or a reprint are what tell them that a book is POD. Common reasons given for identifying a book as POD were ugly covers, poor layout, poor editing, no ISBN, no catalog records available, known self-publishing imprints like CreateSpace, Authorhouse or iUniverse, and a lack of publishing dates. Many librarians who gave this type of response said that they could “always tell” when a book was POD. So that raises the question, aren’t they effectively just biased against self-published books and reprints? If they don’t recognize a traditionally-published book as POD when it crosses their desk, what difference does it make if they have a negative view of POD? I think the answer is that it is not impossible to know that a book is POD even if it is of high quality and easy to catalog. As several respondents pointed out, most POD books have printing on the back page with some arcane data:

Some catalogers and others look for that tell-tale information and may draw conclusions from it about the book as a whole. Also, although ordering systems may not usually give an indication that an academic title is POD when it is, sometimes they do give that indication. Some librarians in an acquisitions role, as they stated in their responses, will avoid purchasing a book on that basis. This means that librarians’ decisions are sometimes affected by a bias against POD that is not borne out by the facts about POD.

For those interested in the raw data from my survey, you can look at it here

I’d like to make a final note of full disclosure. I am personally interested in this issue because I am a former librarian who owns a book publishing company that uses print-on-demand printing. We primarily publish library science titles, so I view our customers as my colleagues as well. It bothers me that many librarians would have a bias against our titles if they knew about how we print them. We use POD because in our field sales volumes are typically low. I decided to go with POD when I formed my company after extensive conversations with a head of another publishing company that publishes a lot of LIS titles. In those conversations I gleaned important and useful information about the publishing business, and I learned that most publishers in the LIS field are using POD, for the same reason I decided to – being in a small, niche market. Because of the stigma attached to POD, however, publishers typically don’t reveal this fact. I hope that with this report I can do a little bit to de-stigmatize this common method of printing books.

March 10, 2017

Izzy Award Winners

In a banner year for journalism by non-conglomerate news outlets, the Park Center for Independent Media (PCIM) has announced the ninth annual Izzy Award will be shared by Mother Jones senior reporter SHANE BAUER and Nation Institute Investigative Fund reporter SETH FREED WESSLER who, working independently, revealed major abuses at for-profit U.S. prisons; and by The Nation senior contributing writer ARI BERMAN, who exposed voter suppression.

A “special documentary honor” will be conferred on “AMERICA DIVIDED,” a docu-series that powerfully illuminates structural inequality in the United States.

The Izzy Award, presented for outstanding achievement in independent media, is named after the late I.F. “Izzy” Stone, the dissident journalist who launched I.F. Stone’s Weekly in 1953 and challenged McCarthyism, racial injustice, the Vietnam War and government deceit.

The award ceremony will be held in Ithaca in April; details to be announced.

Full release here.

Democracy Now! broke the news this morning.

CFP: Allied Media Conference 2017

Call for Proposals
Radical Libraries, Archives, and Museums
Allied Media Conference 2017

Conference Dates: June 15-18, 2017
Location: Detroit, MI

Submission Deadline: March 12, 2017

Libraries, archives, and museums (LAM) are more than places for collecting and storing books and exhibiting artifacts. LAMs can be living, transformative spaces where artists, educators, technologists, and activists convene to access, document, share, organize, and find solutions to issues that impact their communities. We welcome proposals for sessions that will be accessible to participants of all ages and backgrounds, and interpret the work of galleries, libraries, archives, and museums through the lens of media-based organizing. In previous years, we have covered subjects such as restorative justice practices in teen librarianship, starting seed libraries, zine libraries, tool libraries, and community archives that center the narratives of people of color.

We are especially interested in sessions that:
– Challenge traditional gallery, library, archive, and museum structures, institutions, and organizations
– Discuss best practices for community-based organizations that provide books, technology or internet access, creative materials, or collaborative opportunities centering people of color, queer and gender nonconforming folks, disabled people, incarcerated people, and undocumented people
– Consider the role of librarians, archivists, and curators in strengthening the knowledge, culture, and collective memory of communities impacted by social and economic disparity and state sanctioned violence
– Address racism, white supremacy, and issues of inclusion in galleries, libraries, archives, or museums

Beyond the themes outlined above, if the idea of radical libraries, archives and museums resonates with you, we’d love to hear from you. The deadline to submit proposals is March 12th. Please feel free to reach out to me (vmilliner@gmail.com) or one of the other track coordinators on the Allied Media website if you have any questions.

https://www.alliedmedia.org/amc2017/rad-libraries-archives-museums-track

March 9, 2017

The Change We Seek: Understanding EveryLibrary’s Work for Libraries (webinar)

The Change We Seek: Understanding EveryLibrary’s Work for Libraries

Presenter: John Chrastka, Executive Director, EveryLibrary

EveryLibrary, the first national political action committee for libraries, is advancing a policy agenda to work in local communities and with new coalitions to extend funding for libraries. In this webinar, you will learn more about EveryLibrary and the work they are doing to build voter support for public library ballot measures, to help school library communities lobby for new funding support at state and local levels, and to reach voters across the country with calls-to-action in support of their libraries and librarians. Find out about the EveryLibrary 2017 Agenda for political action and the 2017 Coalition Strategy to bring library issues and library resources for social change. Executive Director John Chrastka will discuss ways that you can be involved in this work, and how EveryLibrary is able to support your library activism projects as well. This is an “inside view” of this essential organization.

April 5, 12 noon CDT. One hour duration.

No prior registration is necessary. Just go here at the meeting time:
https://libraryjuice.adobeconnect.com/intro-everylibrary/

March 6, 2017

Personal Donor Challenge for EveryLibrary

We are very happy to renew our “Personal Donor Challenge” for EveryLibrary. EveryLibrary, if you don’t know them already, is a Political Action Committee that helps public, school, and college libraries win bonding, tax, and advisory referenda, ensuring stable funding and access to libraries. Last year, we helped them reach dozens of new monthly personal donors, and encouraged dozens more to renew their donations. This year, we’d like to ask you to help match our $1,000 donation by making a one-time contribution today. This means that if you donate $25, we will match that funding and turn your donation into $50 for libraries in the United States. Go here to donate: https://votelibraries.nationbuilder.com/libraryjuicechallenge

February 8, 2017

Inaugural issue: Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies

Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies
Vol 1 (2017)

Inaugural Issue
Guest Editors: Ronald E. Day, Andrew J Lau, Alycia Sellie

Table of Contents

Editors’ Note
Why is the Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies Needed Today?
Andrew J Lau, Alicia Sellie, Ronald E. Day

Articles
On “Diversity” as Anti-Racism in Library and Information Studies: A Critique
David James Hudson

Towards an Archival Critique: Opening Possibilities for Addressing Neoliberalism in the Archival Field
Marika Cifor, Jamie A. Lee

Mind the Gap: Towards the Integration of Critical Gerontology in Public Library Praxis
Nicole K. Dalmer

Classification Along the Color Line: Excavating Racism in the Stacks
Melissa Adler

Contextualising Information Behavior: A Methodological Approach
Nicole Marie Gaston

Questioning the Past and Possible Futures: Digital Historiography and Critical Librarianship
Heidi L.M. Jacobs, Cal Murgu

Critical Pedagogy In Libraries: A Unified Approach
Melissa M. Gustafson

Open Educational Resources and Rhetorical Paradox in the Neoliberal Univers(ity)
Nora Almeida

Perspectives
Four Theses for Critical Library and Information Studies: A Manifesto
Jonathan Cope

Becoming-Infrastructure: Datafication, Deactivation and the Social Credit System
Ramon Salim Diab

Minting the Obverse: Library and Information Studies as a One-Sided Coin
Tim Gorichanaz

Engaging an Author in a Critical Reading of Subject Headings
Amelia Bowen Koford

Importance of the Intersection of Library and Information Sciences with Systems Theory
Hannah Lee

Literature Review
A Case for Critical Data Studies in Library and Information Studies
Tami Oliphant

Book Reviews
Review of The Undersea Network
Lisa Levesque

February 2, 2017

Teaching for Justice: Implementing Social Justice in the LIS Classroom (new book)

Teaching for Justice
Implementing Social Justice in the LIS Classroom

Editors: Nicole A. Cooke and Miriam E. Sweeney
Price: $35.00
Published: February 2017
ISBN: 978-1-63400-017-8
Printed on acid-free paper

This book is number one in the Litwin Books/Library Juice Press Series on Critical Race Studies and Multiculturalism in LIS, Rose L. Chou and Annie Pho, series editors.

Borne of a professional development workshop, Teaching for Justice highlights the commitment and efforts of LIS faculty and instructors who feature social justice theory and strategies in their courses and classroom practices. This book is geared towards LIS instructors who have begun to incorporate social justice into their course content, as well as those who are interested in learning more about how to address social justice in their classrooms.

Chapters provide a pedagogical foundation and motivation for teaching social justice in LIS as a stand alone course or as a theme integrated within topical courses that seemingly “have no relationship” to such issues. The experiences and reflections of chapter contributors will prepare readers with strong arguments for the inclusion of social justice in their LIS classroom, curriculum, and school policies, provide an array of practical techniques intended to secure such inclusion, and a instill a sense of confidence for advocating for the incorporation of social justice as a mainstay of LIS education.

This book is available on Amazon.

February 1, 2017

Working with Library Juice Press: Webinar Slides

A little bit ago we presented our first webinar, Working with Library Juice Press: An Orientation. If you attended, thank you, and I hope you enjoyed it. I promised to share the slides and a recording after the event. I must regretfully apologize that I screwed up the recording, and we will not be sharing it. However, the slides are available here: http://libraryjuicepress.com/slides/Working_with_LJP_slides.pptx

We plan on running this webinar again in about six months, for those interested. We should have issues with the recorder straightened out by then.

January 27, 2017

Call for Essays: We Can Do I.T. : Women in Library Information Technology

Call for Essays

Working Title: We Can Do I.T. : Women in Library Information Technology
Editors: Jenny Brandon, Sharon Ladenson, Kelly Sattler
Submission Deadline: March 27, 2017 (extended)
Publisher: Library Juice Press

Description of book:
What roles are women playing in information technology (I.T.) in libraries? What are rewards that women experience, as well as challenges they face in library I.T.? What are future visions for women in library I.T.?

This edited collection will provide a voice for people to share insights into the culture, challenges, and rewards of being a woman working in library I.T. We are soliciting personal narratives from anyone who works in a library about what it is like to be a woman, or working with women, in library I.T. We also seek essays on visions for the future of women within library I.T. and how such visions could be achieved. This collection should be useful not only for those pursuing a career in library I.T., but also for library managers seeking to facilitate a more inclusive environment for the future. Through publishing a collection of personal narratives, we also seek to bring experiences of women in library I.T. from the margins to the center.

For the purposes of this collection, we consider library I.T. to include responsibilities in computer networks, hardware, and software support; computer programming (e.g. coding in python, php, java…); web development (e.g. admins, coders, front/back end developers,…); and/or the management of such areas.

Possible topics include but are not limited to the following:
– How you started in library I.T.
– Stories related to being a woman in library I.T.
– Experiences of acceptance or resistance within the library I.T. community
– Tips and advice for other women seeking a career in library I.T.
– Changes in your career path because of entering library I.T.
– Changes you’d like to see happen within the library I.T. culture
– Advice for library management on how to improve library I.T. culture
– A vision for the future about/for women in library I.T.

Timeline:
Submission deadline: March 13, 2017
Notification/Feedback regarding submission: May 12, 2017
Editing and revision: June – July 2017
Final manuscript due to publisher: September 2017

Submissions:
This volume will contain commentary, stories, and essays (from 140 characters to 1,500 words).
If your submission is tentatively accepted, we may request modifications.
Material cannot be previously published.
To submit your essay, please fill out this Google form: https://goo.gl/forms/6oE82aFe7atFlP6j1
For questions, email womenlibit@googlegroups.com

About the Editors:

Kelly Sattler has a degree in computer engineering and spent 12 years in corporate I.T. before earning her MLIS degree from University of Illinois-Urbana/Champaign. Currently, she is the Head of Web Services at Michigan State University Libraries.

Jenny Brandon earned a BA in interdisciplinary humanities at Michigan State University, and an MLIS from Wayne State University. She is a self-taught web designer/front end developer, and is currently employed in Web Services at Michigan State University. She is also a reference librarian.

Sharon Ladenson is Gender and Communication Studies Librarian at Michigan State University. Her writing on feminist pedagogy and critical information literacy is included in works such as Critical Library Instruction: Theories and Methods (from Library Juice Press) and the Critical Library Pedagogy Handbook (from the Association of College and Research Libraries). She is an active member of the Women and Gender Studies Section (WGSS) of the Association of College and Research Libraries, and has presented with WGSS colleagues at the National Women’s Studies Association Annual Conference.

January 10, 2017

CFP: Libraries and Nonprofits: Collaboration for the Public Good

About the Book

Libraries and Nonprofits: Collaboration for the Public Good (Library Juice Press) will consider the range of partnerships entered into by all types of libraries and nonprofits and will provide resources and best practices for nurturing these collaborations. We are seeking domestic and international case studies which highlight successful (or problematic) collaborations between libraries and nonprofit organizations for inclusion in the book. Case studies may address the following themes relating to nonprofit organizations and library collaborations including (but not limited to):

* civic engagement
* public health
* social safety nets/social work
* arts and culture
* education/literacy
* environment/sustainability/food justice
* LGBTQIA
* anti-racism
* disability rights
* legal aid/human rights
* housing/planning

Examples range from collaborations with financial literacy organizations to provide free or low-cost tax preparation; legal aid organizations to provide civic education and human rights workshops; literacy organizations to provide storytime programs, ESL or tutoring services; or museums to provide exhibitions, pop-up galleries, or STEAM programming.

How to Participate

Authors are invited to submit a case study proposal as an email attachment in Word or PDF to librariesandnonprofits@gmail.com on or before Monday, February 20, 2017. The case study proposal should be 300-500 words (Chicago Style) clearly explaining the intent and details of the proposed case study as it relates to the topics listed above. Proposed case studies should be based on unpublished work, unique to this publication and not submitted or intended to be simultaneously submitted elsewhere.

Authors will be notified by Monday, March 27, 2017 about the status of their proposals and sent case study guidelines. Completed case studies are expected to be between 2,000-4,000 words, although shorter or longer case studies are negotiable. Full case studies are expected to be submitted by Monday, June 26, 2017.

Proposals should include

* Author name(s), institutional or organizational affiliation, job title/role
* Brief author(s) bio
* Proposed case study title
* A summary of the proposed case study (300-500 words)

About the authors

Tatiana Bryant, Special Collections Librarian, University of Oregon Libraries

Jonathan O. Cain, Librarian for Data Initiatives and Public Policy, Planning and Management, University of Oregon Libraries

CFP: Libraries: Culture, History, and Society

Libraries: Culture, History, and Society is now accepting submissions for our second issue, to be published in Fall 2017. A semiannual peer-reviewed publication from the Library History Round Table of the American Library Association and the Penn State University Press, LCHS will be available in print and online via JSTOR and Project Muse.

The only journal in the United States devoted to library history, LCHS positions library history as its own field of scholarship, while promoting innovative cross-disciplinary research on libraries’ relationships with their unique environments. LCHS brings together scholars from many disciplines to examine the history of libraries as institutions, collections, and services, as well as the experiences of library workers and users. There are no limits of time and space, and libraries of every type are included (private, public, corporate, and academic libraries, and special collections). In addition to Library Science, the journal welcomes contributors from History, English, Literary Studies, Sociology, Education, Gender/Women’s Studies, Race/Ethnic Studies, Philosophy, Political Science, Architecture, Anthropology, Geography, Economics, and other disciplines.

Submissions for volume 1, issue 2, are due February 24, 2017. Manuscripts must be submitted electronically through LCHS’s Editorial Manager system at http://www.editorialmanager.com/LCHS/default.aspx. They must also conform to the instructions for authors at http://bit.ly/LCHScfp1. New scholars, and authors whose work is in the “idea” stage, are welcomed to contact the editors if they would like guidance prior to submission.

We are excited to see this journal become a reality. We welcome your thoughts as we establish a platform for studying libraries within their broader humanistic and social contexts.

For further questions, please contact the editors:
Bernadette Lear, BAL19@psu.edu
Eric Novotny, ECN1@psu.edu

January 7, 2017

Webinar: Working with Library Juice Press: An Orientation

Working with Library Juice Press: An Orientation

Presenter: Alison M. Lewis, Chief Acquisitions Editor for Library Juice Press

This free webinar will provide an overview of the processes involved in having a book published with Library Juice Press. Topics covered will include types of books we publish, submitting a proposal, working with your editor, creating a quality manuscript, and an overview and timeline of the publishing process. The intended audience is anyone curious about our publishing process, particularly those who are potentially interested in submitting a book proposal to us. Authors and editors who currently have a book contract with us may also wish to attend. The presentation will last approximately 45 minutes, with 10-15 minutes for questions afterwards.

February 1st, 12 noon EST. One hour duration.

No prior registration is necessary. Just go here at the meeting time:
https://libraryjuice.adobeconnect.com/working-with-ljp/

December 19, 2016

Extended deadline for CFP: CAPAL17: Foundations & Futures: Critical Reflections on the Pasts, Presents, and Possibilities of Academic Librarianship

CFP: Call for Proposals

CAPAL17: Foundations & Futures: Critical Reflections on the Pasts, Presents, and Possibilities of Academic Librarianship

CAPAL/ACBAP Annual Meeting – May 30 – June 1, 2017

Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences 2017
Ryerson University
Toronto, Ontario

The Canadian Association of Professional Academic Librarians (CAPAL) invites you to participate in its annual conference, to be held as part of the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences 2017 in Toronto, Ontario, which lies in the territory of the Haudenosaunee and the Mississaugas of the New Credit River. This conference offers librarians and allied professionals across all disciplines an alternative space to share research and scholarship, challenge current thinking about professional issues, and forge new relationships.

Theme

In keeping with the Congress 2017 theme, From Far and Wide: The Next 150, our focus is CAPAL17: Foundations & Futures: Critical Reflections on the Pasts, Presents, and Possibilities of Academic Librarianship.

This conference provides an opportunity for the academic library community to critically examine and discuss together the ways in which our profession is influenced by its social, political, and economic environments. By considering academic librarianship within its historical contexts, its presents, and its possible futures, and by situating it within evolving cultural frameworks and structures of power, we can better understand the ways in which academic librarianship may reflect, reinforce, or challenge these contexts both positively and negatively.

How can “recalling, retelling, and scrutinizing” our stories help us to understand the present and envision the future of academic librarianship? What are the logics and practices that constitute and reconstitute our profession, and inform our assumptions and approaches?

This conference engages with current discussions surrounding what many consider to be a significant juncture in academic librarianship: the turn towards critically examining the contexts and roots of our profession. How for instance, do we as a profession integrate understanding of the pasts and presents of broader social contexts and engage meaningfully in these necessary conversations?

Potential Topics:

Papers presented might relate to aspects of the following themes (though they need not be limited to them):
– Critical reflections on librarian identity, agency, and representation (in areas such as gender, sexuality, race, decolonization/indigenization, professionalism, stereotypes)
– Critical reflections on core values: intellectual and academic freedom, access to information, privacy of information, preservation and curation, professionalism, etc.
– Bringing the oppositional practices of broader social mobilization around movements (e.g., Black Lives Matter, Idle No More, transgender rights, and others) to bear on our work
– Critical librarianship in practice: collections development and management, information literacy, reference services, and other areas of service (e.g., cultural bias in knowledge organization; absent histories, etc.)
– Critical reflections on career paths (e.g., early-career professionals, new and emerging roles, specializations, management, leadership, etc.)
– Unpacking of language, rhetoric, and discourse that influence and constitute our profession and services (e.g., buzzwords, military or business speak, oppositional discourses of past/future, print/digital, progressive/obsolete, etc.)
– Modes of knowledge creation, research dissemination, and engagement (e.g., oral traditions, co-creation, copyright, open access, and other forms of scholarly communication, etc.)
– Critical review of current educational requirements and training for academic librarians

The Program Committee invites proposals for individual papers as well as proposals for panel submissions of three papers. Proposed papers must be original and not have been published elsewhere.

Individual papers are typically 20 minutes in length. For individual papers, please submit an abstract of no more than 400 words and a presentation title, with a brief biographical statement and your contact information.

For complete panels, please submit a panel abstract of no more than 400 words as well as a list of all participants and brief biographical statements, and a separate abstract of no more than 400 words for each presenter. Please identify and provide participants’ contact information for the panel organizer.

Please feel free to contact the Program Committee to discuss a topic for a paper, panel, or other session format. Proposals should be emailed as an attachment as a .doc or .docx file, using the following filename conventions:
Lastname_Keywordoftopic.docx

Proposals and questions should be directed to the Program Chair, Courtney Waugh at cwaugh5@uwo.ca

Extended deadline for Proposals: the 3rd of January, 2017

Further information about the conference, as well as Congress 2017 more broadly, will be available soon.

Journal of Radical Librarianship call for editors

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Stuart Lawson <00000a1635137d03-dmarc-request@jiscmail.ac.uk>
Date: 2016-12-19 7:56 GMT-03:00
Subject: [RLC-DISCUSS] Journal of Radical Librarianship: call for editors
To: RLC-DISCUSS@jiscmail.ac.uk

Hi,

The Journal of Radical Librarianship has now been running for over two years. The number of articles we’ve published has been small, but a couple of research articles have been published this year – Jennifer Soutter’s ‘The Core Competencies for 21st Century CARL (Canadian Association of Research Libraries) Librarians: through a neoliberal lens’, and Ian Clark’s ‘The digital divide in the post-Snowden era’ – and more are in the pipeline.

Since it’s been a while since we started the journal, the current editors have decided it’s time to make an explicit call for other people to get involved as well if they wish. The initial editorial group has worked well but it was formed by whoever who willing and able at the time, and it was never intended to be static. Two people have recently stepped down as editors so it would be a good time for anyone who is interested in joining to come on board.

The journal can publish articles across a wide range of subject areas. The ones we have designated to specific editors at the moment are listed on the website (https://journal.radicallibrarianship.org/index.php/journal/about) but this is by no means exhaustive and we would welcome anyone with expertise in an area they feel is not represented – or to volunteer to share editorial responsibilities for an area that is listed.

‘Editorial responsibilities’ essentially means guiding research and theory articles through peer review. Feel free to ask me anything about the process off-list if you like. In addition, please let us know if you’d be happy to lend your time as a peer reviewer.

Thanks,
Stuart (on behalf of the editors)