August 22, 2014

The Digital Future of Education – New Issue of the International Review of Information Ethics

International Review of Information Ethics
Vol. 21 – July 2014
The Digital Future of Education
edited by Johannes Britz, Michael Zimmer

Contents:

The Digital Future of Education: An Introduction
by Johannes Britz, Michael Zimmer

The Ethics of Big Data in Higher Education
by Jeffrey Alan Johnson

Student Privacy: Harm and Context
by Mark MacCarthy

The Ethics of Student Privacy: Building Trust for Ed Tech
by Jules Polonetsky and Omer Tene

Teachers as nightmare readers: Estonian high-school teachers’ experiences and opinions about student-teacher interaction on Facebook
by Maria Murumaa-Mengel and Andra Siibak

Canadian University Social Software Guidelines and Academic Freedom: An Alarming Labour Trend
by Taryn Lough and Toni Samek

Digital Content Delivery in Higher Education: Expanded Mechanisms for Subordinating the Professoriate and Academic Precariat
by Wilhelm Peekhaus

Digital Education and Oppression: Rethinking the Ethical Paradigm of the Digital Future
by Trent M Kays

Book Review: Honorary Volume for Evi Laskari
by Herman T. Tavani

All content is free, here.

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August 21, 2014

Message from Patrick Gavin to Litwin Books

Dear Rory Litwin and the entire Litwin Books team,

I am writing to express my gratitude for the opportunity to apply for the Dissertation Award. Having such a venue for doctoral students to share our work is important, if unfortunately rare. It is with great honor and happiness that I have accepted the 2014 award. Thanks to all of you at Litwin Books! Please also pass on my appreciation to anyone else involved, most especially the members of the advisory board, Jonathan Furner, John Budd, and Ron Day. Indeed, it was a wonderful opportunity to have been able to share my writing with scholars of such pedigree. Please also extend my gratitude to Ron Day for his kind words regarding my project.

Work on the project continues. As it wraps up over the course of this academic year, I will certainly keep Litwin Books in the front of my mind as a potential venue for its publication.

Cheers,
Patrick

Patrick Gavin, MA, MLIS
Doctoral Candidate, LIS
Faculty of Information and Media Studies
University of Western Ontario

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August 18, 2014

Call for Submissions: Series on Critical Race Studies and Multiculturalism in LIS

Series on Critical Race Studies and Multiculturalism in LIS

Sujei Lugo, Series Editor

Litwin Books and Library Juice Press seek book proposals and manuscripts for a new series, Critical Race Studies and Multiculturalism in Library and Information Studies, edited by Sujei Lugo. This series aims to collect and publish works from theoretical, practical and personal perspectives that critically engage issues of race, ethnicity, cultural diversity and equity in library and information science (LIS).

Potential topics include:

  • Historical understandings and current explorations of race, racism and whiteness in LIS and LIS education
  • Critical race and multicultural approaches to LIS and their relation to: anti-racism, censorship, immigration, information access, institutional and systemic racism, intellectual freedom, gender inequities, language, post-colonialism and settler colonialism, power structures, social justice, structural oppression, transnationalism, and white privilege
  • Analysis and exploration of race and ethnicity and its intersections with ability, age, class, gender, nationality, sexuality, etc.
  • Theoretical perspectives and practical strategies for promoting racial equity and addressing racial oppression in the profession, including cataloging, collection development, community outreach, funding, instruction, Internet, library schools, management, programs, technology, and the workplace
  • Practical approaches and examples of developing collections and archives in nonprofits grassroots, and other community-based organizations that work for/with historically marginalized racial communities
  • Works that address library and information needs of African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, Chicano/as, Latino/as, etc.
  • Explorations of issues of race and whiteness in children’s and young adult librarianship, school librarianship, and prison librarianship
  • Historical perspectives on racial, ethnic and cultural issues in librarianship and the role of activists, archivists, librarians, social movements, and library associations, organizations or groups have played in promoting racial equity and challenging racism and oppression in the profession
  • Works that explore and discuss race and librarianship in countries outside the United States are also welcome

Please submit queries, proposals, and manuscripts to Sujei Lugo, sujeilugo@gmail.com

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August 7, 2014

U.S. sought to edit the historical record of a court proceeding

This news from the Electronic Freedom Foundation:

UNSEALED: The US Sought Permission To Change The Historical Record Of A Public Court Proceeding

A few weeks ago we fought a battle for transparency in our flagship NSA spying case, Jewel v. NSA. But, ironically, we weren’t able to tell you anything about it until now.

On June 6, the court held a long hearing in Jewel in a crowded, open courtroom, widely covered by the press. We were even on the local TV news on two stations. At the end, the Judge ordered both sides to request a transcript since he ordered us to do additional briefing. But when it was over, the government secretly, and surprisingly sought permission to “remove” classified information from the transcript, and even indicated that it wanted to do so secretly, so the public could never even know that they had done so.

More…

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Library Juice Press Annual Paper Contest

Library Juice Press Annual Paper Contest

The intention of this contest is to encourage and reward good work in the field of library and information studies, humanistically understood, through a monetary award and public recognition.

The contest is open to librarians, library students, academics, and others.

Acceptable paper topics cover the full range of topics in the field of library and information studies, loosely defined.

Papers submitted may be unpublished, pending publication, or published in the year of the award.

Single and multiple-authored papers will be accepted.

Any type of paper may be entered as long as it is not a report of an empirical study. Examples of accepted forms would be literature review essays, analytical essays, historical papers, and personal essays. The work may include some informal primary research, but may not essentially be the report of a study.

Submitted papers may be part of a larger project.

The minimum length is 3000 words. The maximum length is 10,000 words.

Criteria for judgment:

- Clarity of writing
- Originality of thought
- Sincerity of effort at reaching something true
- Soundness of argumentation (where applicable)
- Relevance to our time and situation

The award shall consist of $1000 and a certificate suitable for framing.

Entries must be submitted in MS Word format by September 1st. Entries may be submitted to inquiries@libraryjuicepress.com.

The winning paper, and possibly a number of honorable mentions, are announced on November 1st.

Papers will be judged by a committee selected for their accomplishments in the field, and in order to represent a range of perspectives.

Although we are a publisher, submission of a paper for this award in itself does not imply any transfer, licensing, or sharing of your publication rights.

Past winners

2013 – Ryan Shaw, for “Information Organization and the Philosophy of History”, published in JASIST in June 2013.

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Letter from Don Lash to NYPL on one-sided “controversial” labeling of Israel/Palestine studies

Letter from Don Lash to New York Public Library President, on one-sided “controversial” labeling of books on Israel/Palestine:

Dear President Marx,

I previously communicated with your office in an e-mail on August 5, during which I expressed concern that access to important work by the prominent academic historian Ilan Pappe was restricted to a non-circulating research collection and could only be viewed by appointment. It was also given a “trigger warning” in the form of a categorization as “controversial literature.” I informed you that I had made an offer through AskNYPL to arrange donation of copies of The Ethnic Cleansing of Palestine to circulate. I have since received a response, and I was pleased that this offer was accepted.

My remaining concern is over the fact that the Dorot Jewish Division, the research collection that as of now has the only copy of The Ethnic Cleansing of Palestine, is permitted to to characterize work critical of Zionism and Israel as “controversial,” a designation that is not used for pro-Israel, anti-Palestinian literature in its collection or elsewhere in the NYPL catalog. The designation is used for a range of historical and political works beyond those of Pappe. More troublingly, in effect such works are associated with other literature given trigger warnings by the collection, most notably virulently anti-Semitic literature and Holocaust denial literature. The implicit suggestion is that these categories are somehow akin, which is not only offensive but indefensible on the merits. In addition to the content-based stigmatization of one perspective on the history of Palestine/Israel, the trigger warning is a disservice to students and scholars, who may be misled by the characterization into thinking the work is of dubious quality. This is particularly likely when access is restricted and library patrons would have to make an extraordinary effort even to see the work.
I suggest that you or a designee look at how the collection is applying these trigger warnings, what criteria is used, and whether the effect of this practice is to privilege work promoting one viewpoint and disadvantage work promoting others. While these practices appear to be limited to the Dorot collection, I think this matter affects the integrity of NYPL as a whole.

Thank you for your careful consideration of this matter.

Don Lash

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August 3, 2014

Conference Agenda – Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies

Litwin Books has organized a colloquium to take place this October at the University of Toronto, based on our book, Feminist and Queer Information Studies Reader.

The colloquium is called Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies (named after Emily Drabinski’s series with Litwin Books). We have recently posted the schedule of presentations, so you can see what will be going on there.

The deadline for abstracts is passed and all the papers have been selected, but there is still room for more people to attend. You can register here.

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July 18, 2014

REAL: Resistance Education At Libraries

Exploring Deep Green Resistance, I ran across their library campaign: REAL: Resistance Education At Libraries. The idea is to organize efforts to promote radical environmentalist literature at libraries, by prioritizing libraries according to where such materials are most needed. I will be sharing this info with TFOE and the Sustainability Round Table, although there is something of a mismatch in terms of overall goals and a sense of the degree to which things have to change…

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July 16, 2014

Teaching Sophistry

a-famous-cause.jpg!Blog[1]

In the first years of my career as a librarian, I was working on the Reference Desk when an undergraduate student asked for help finding articles on a rather general subject in the social sciences.  My suspicion was that he would do better if he were able to refine his topic, and so I began a typical reference interview.  After a few questions from me, he smiled and told me that it really didn’t matter what the articles he came away with said, since he had already written the paper.  He was just looking for five sources to append to the paper to fulfill his professor’s requirement.  It was no surprise to me that there were students who were doing essentially faux research, but I was surprised that this student would be so up front about it.  Over the years, I have come to realize that faux research is quite a bit more common among undergraduates than I originally had thought.  Worse yet, the assignments that are being given by well-meaning professors and instructors, particularly at the freshman level, are encouraging this sort of thing.  Prior to becoming a librarian, I myself made such assignments, not realizing just how these assignments defeated the goal of training students to conduct serious, open-minded inquiries into important questions.

A common English 101 assignment where I work is for a student to develop a thesis on a controversial topic and then to go to the library (or the library’s web portal) to conduct research.  The student is required to find articles for and against their thesis and write a paper that defends their thesis, offering positive reasons for their position and refuting the arguments against their position.  As an English course, it is an exercise in composition and argumentation and an opportunity to get some experience with library resources.  Communication 107 requires something similar when the students compose a “persuasive speech.”  All of that is fine, of course, and I’m sure that very often the assignment is quite beneficial, but as this is often a student’s first experience with college-level writing, too many of them come away with the view that this is how research is done:  the researcher uncovers reasons to confirm their beliefs and thinks up clever arguments to dismiss what they don’t believe.  They are unconcerned about the cogency of their arguments and consequently are rewarded by employing all manner of fallacies.

In some instances, the thesis that they begin with does not lend itself well to the “taking sides” approach.  I recall one student whose thesis was that concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) were environmentally destructive.  She understood that there was a controversy about CAFOs and that many people claimed that they were environmentally destructive, so she assumed that there must be people “on the other side” who thought they were not destructive.  After finding a lot of sources that described the detrimental environmental effects of CAFOs (and spending a lot of time on this), she was frustrated by not being able to find any sources taking the “con” position.  She thought they surely must be out there, since CAFOs were so controversial.  Of course, her problem could have been solved if the instructor had been able to make it clear to her that the environmental impact of CAFOs was not a live debate.  Instead, the controversy lay with the larger questions about animal welfare, consumer choice, the economy, and the role of environmental regulations, but I doubt that the student had approached her instructor about the topic or discussed it in a manner that was sufficiently clear to get better direction about framing her thesis.  In any case, had she done so, I suspect her initial disposition against CAFOs probably would have caused her to fall into the advocacy trap taught in English 101.

Consider a more appropriate assignment model:  Frist, students form teams which select a topic about which they know little or have no strong opinion and are sent to the library to learn about it independently of each other.  They are to accumulate a variety of sources on the topic – the more the better and the more diverse the better – but there should be no suggestion that there are only two views (pro and con).  The students would then rank the sources according to which in their judgment was strongest and most insightful.  Second, they would share and read one another’s sources and convene their teams to discuss the relative merits of the sources.  Third, they each would write a paper based on the team’s sources, defending a thesis that the student would develop after completing the second phase of the assignment.  Finally, each student would read and comment on the quality of the work of each member of their team.

The assignment model I describe above provides a far better introduction to the actual process of serious research. It asks students to engage in a genuine inquiry, recognizes that they must learn from previous research, affirms the importance of hearing and understanding the views of others who are doing similar research, and asks them to make an honest judgment about the matter based not on their preconceived notions, but on the facts and/or values that truly bear on the question.  Most of all, it will help students avoid the trap of simply finding ways to confirm their own opinions and dismiss or ignore the serious arguments against those opinions.  It puts them in a situation in which they must listen to other opinions and honestly assess the strength of those opinions.  It potentially exposes them to a variety of research methods that they might not have considered and, of course, requires that they compose a quality essay that will stand up to review by their peers.  I wish I had made assignments of this sort when I was teaching Philosophy 105: Contemporary Moral Problems as well as a few other philosophy classes.  It even might have been useful as the only assignment in a capstone seminar.  As a librarian, I would love to work with students who are genuinely engaged in learning about an issue and not merely constructing an argument to complete an assignment.  We need to be certain that what we are doing is training students to be open to whatever evidence bears on their research question and especially open to whatever conclusions that evidence indicates.  We must be careful not to train them in the techniques of the sophist.

This leads me to a larger concern that too much of this sort of education has bred a population that conceives of public discourse to be English 101 writ large and that the disregard for the facts of the world and the principles of reason have turned public discourse into something that more resembles a verbal wrestling match or worse, a boxing match and not a conscientious discussion of important public matters aimed at collective agreement on a workable public policy.  I hear this on radio talk shows, read it in social media, in mainstream journalism, and in the comment sections that follow what is ostensibly news reporting; and it certainly appears in the numerous blogs that have the express purpose of advocating a particular view.  Certainly, this style of discourse always has been with us, but I sense that it is particularly virulent today.  I count the 1982 debut of the CNN program “Crossfire” as my first clear encounter with it in a national forum.  “Crossfire” was (and probably again is, though I have not watched its recent manifestation) a program in which guests were badgered by loaded questions, not allowed to finish their answers, and sometimes simply shouted down; a program which routinely produced more heat than light.  It valorized the worst style of dialog and sadly became something of a model for future public affairs talk shows.  Tellingly for the connection between this style of discourse and academia, George Washington University became the host site from which the program aired before a live audience for about three years.

The format reached the height of absurdity with the “Jerry Springer Show” which, of course, did not deal with public affairs and was purely “entertainment,” but nonetheless made confrontation the primary form of interpersonal interaction.  Eventually, partisan media coverage of public affairs retreated to their own corners and devolved into outlets for partisan propaganda first introduced by right-wing radio and FOX News, but quickly followed by Air America and MSNBC.  I would not maintain that there is parity between these ideological opponents, but their techniques for adversarial argumentation are formed in the same mold, and it is the mold that we subtly and sometimes not so subtly are teaching to our undergraduates.

I also am not suggesting that there is a position of pure objectivity that one can and should assume when discussing public affairs, but we are capable of exercising a little self-criticism and a sense of fairness.  We can recognize self-serving attitudes – even our own – and demonstrate respect for others with whom we disagree.  We can adopt an attitude that promotes a serious-minded search for public policy solutions that just might lie outside of our own pre-conceived notions.  Too often we lack the virtues of humility and charity in our discourse.  Humility recognizes that we are one among many people, each with a unique and limited experience of the issues, that we each have misconceptions and incomplete understandings of complicated questions, and that personally, the best thing that can come out of a dialog is that we ourselves will discover our misconceptions, expand our experience, and change our views to arrive at a corrected understanding of the issues and the world.  Charity recognizes that the arguments made by others may not always be couched in their strongest form and that instead of seeking chinks in one’s opponent’s armor, one should seek to construct the strongest case for everyone in the conversation.  By doing so our own views are better tested and can be legitimately corroborated or discarded for superior views.  These are the virtues of the Enlightenment which has received, I believe, unfair criticism for the short comings of certain Enlightenment figures.  It was best described by Immanuel Kant in his essay “What Is Enlightenment?” as “the public use of reason.”  The public use of reason promises solutions to a huge number of problems we face, but it requires dialogical virtues that are rare today.

Perhaps the clearest distortion of public discourse through sophistic techniques has come from those who are against taking action to mitigate climate change by reducing the production of greenhouse gases.  The engines behind this distortion are the professional blogs established by groups that promote a libertarian economy regardless of obvious market failures and supported by the fossil fuel industry.  Anyone who is familiar with the research into the climate change will easily recognize the patent lies and distortions, the ad hominem attacks, and various other fallacies employed by these bloggers to confuse the public debate.  Naomi Oreskes and Erik Conway’s landmark book The Merchants of Doubt remains an excellent exposé of the network of self-serving climate change denial and its history.  The denial industry’s power rests on the extraordinary wealth of its patrons. Beyond the blogs, our culture of discourse has become so debased that many people take their cues from these bloggers and engage in debates where they seek victory at any cost, regardless of fact or reason.  Their contribution to the discourse ranges from canny deceptions to incendiary trolling, and too often, their opponents fight fire with fire.  It is a sad and dangerous state of affairs perhaps best described in the lyrics from Bob Dylan’s song “It’s Alright, Ma (I’m Only Bleeding):”

While money doesn’t talk, it swears / Obscenity, who really cares / Propaganda, all is phony.

As an educator and librarian I feel a responsibility to uphold the Enlightenment values that promote a fair-minded understanding of the world, but I feel swamped by an ever devolving culture of propaganda and sophistry.  It’s hard to know the way out.  If anyone has a compass, I’d love to hear from you.

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July 15, 2014

Zoia Horn has passed on

I have just learned that Zoia Horn died on July 12th. She has been an inspiration to me from the time I was in library school in the late 90s. I was inspired by her memoirs and later by her personally when I visited her Berkeley. (I have just found out that her memoirs, ZOIA! Memoirs of Zoia Horn, Battler for the People’s Right to Know, are online in full text at Archive.org.)

This announcement of her 2002 Jackie Eubanks Memorial Award goes into some nice biographical detail. Besides the Jackie Eubanks Award, which was given by the Alternatives in Print Task Force of SRRT, she also received the 2002 Robert B. Downs Intellectual Freedom Award, given by the UIUC GSLIS. Here is part of the announcement of that award:

Thirty years ago, when Zoia Horn was subpoenaed to appear at the trial of the “Harrisburg Seven,” she refused to testify, was found in contempt of court, and jailed for three weeks. This jail sentence effectively ended her library career, but she used her information skills in her work for both the Center for Investigative Reporting and DataCenter, both of Oakland, CA. She has also remained active in intellectual freedom issues over the years, chairing the Intellectual Freedom Committees of ALA, New Jersey Library Association, and the California Library Association, sponsoring resolutions affirming the confidentiality of the relationship between libraries and their users. In 1986, Horn brought her Right to Know project from DataCenter to ALA, who then formed the Coalition on Government Information, a group of about 50 organizations that are interested in stemming the trend toward less public access to government information.

The California Library Association gives an annual Intellectual Freedom Award named in her honor.

When someone dies, I always find it less tragic when that person has lived to a ripe old age and had a full life. Zoia was 96 years old when she passed on. That is old; she did not die before her time. I want to take this occasion to honor and celebrate her life.

One last link – this article from the Berkeley Daily Planet in 2004: Zoia Horn Takes Pride in Provoking.

Zoia, thank you for all that you did.

(The photo above taken by me at the protest of the SF Marriott during the 2001 ALA conference. It was an informational picket for the workers who were fighting for a contract.)

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July 14, 2014

Quiet Please (film about homeless library users)

QUIET, PLEASE from Quincy J. Walters on Vimeo.

About homeless people who use the library….

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July 8, 2014

Interview with Tony Castelletto

Tony Castelletto has been programming computers on one platform or another since the late 1980s, and received his MLIS in 2008 from Drexel. He has worked on unusual information projects throughout his career, starting as a technician on small NASA missions, managing the information pipelines that carried data from satellite to ground. Tony received his introduction to Library Science working as a programmer on Digital Library projects for the University of Michigan’s Digital Library Initiative. Following his library science education, Tony curated data collections for the Linguistic Data Consortium where he also helped produced electronic dictionaries in Yoruba, Mawukakan, and Tamil. Now he is scheduled to teach a series of classes for Library Juice Academy on computer programming, using Python. Tony agreed to be interviewed for the Library Juice Academy blog, so people can learn a bit about his classes and find out if they would be right for them.

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July 6, 2014

Philosopher Librarians on ALA Connect (to meet at ALA)

“Philosopher Librarians,” the erstwhile Facebook group, is now a group on ALA Connect, the point being to organize a lunchtime get together at ALA Annual in San Francisco next year, and to have any discussions in the meantime that people feel like having. To join you are supposed to have a degree in philosophy, whether it’s your bachelor’s degree or a master’s or a Ph.D.

I really hope this works. Philosophy majors have a unique take on things and a shared way of thinking. I think it would be a lot of fun if this group takes off, so tell your philosopher-librarian friends.

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July 1, 2014

Patrick Gavin Receives the 2014 Litwin Books Award for Ongoing Dissertation Research in the Philosophy of Information

Award Announcement

July 1, 2014

We are pleased to announce the winner of the 2014 Litwin Books Award for Ongoing Dissertation Research in the Philosophy of Information. We are granting this year’s award to Patrick Gavin of the Faculty of Information and Media Studies at the University of Western Ontario, based on his dissertation proposal, titled, “On Informationalized Borderzones: A Study in the Politics and Ethics of Emerging Border Architectures.” Award Committee member Ron Day had the following comments on Gavin’s work:

“The modern documentary tradition transforms spaces into places and people into identities. Modernity is synonymous with this event and is unthinkable without it, but the violence is even more ancient in its cult of group and personal identities and the documentary functions of writing. The modern documentary tradition itself, however, is a tremendously important event, which Patrick Gavin’s dissertation analyzes in terms of the tradition’s contemporary technocracy and devices in establishing and reinforcing ‘real’ borders, ramping up forces of truly apocalyptic governance, power, and greed that ancient tribal identities and patriarchs could only have wished for. Today, in an era when information technologies have threatened to break down borders, all sorts of ancient and modern ‘traditions’ and ‘states’ and their modern patriarchs and protectors have become unglued and are issuing their greatest, most reactionary, most venomous and violent powers and armies to harness this trans-modernity. ‘Information,’ as a liberating force, is becoming reharnessed into the convoluted stasis of religious zealots, modern nation states, and capital markets, roping information and its speakers back into the modern documentary tradition of the past two centuries and its borders, even as information was born out of this and threatened to break away in the communication, ultimately, of life itself. Gavin should be congratulated on his well chosen and well analyzed dissertation, whose theme is timely again and again, and invites consideration by a wide body of readers interested in information, communication, and the meaning of the technical turmoils of a late modernity, that is, after all, a synonym for contemporary human consciousness at its logical and necessary wit’s end.”

The award consists of a certificate suitable for framing and $1000 check.

Since this award is for ongoing research, other applicants who are still working on their dissertations will be eligible to enter their work next year, and we strongly encourage them to do so.

For more information about the award, please visit http://litwinbooks.com/award.php.

Rory Litwin
Litwin Books, LLC
PO Box 188784
Sacramento, CA 95818

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June 24, 2014

Baudrillard on the futility of information

There’s a passage from the first part of Jean Baudrillard’s In the Shadow of the Silent Majorities that always resonated with my more pessimistic moments of doing library instruction. There is a faith involved in pursuing information literacy, a passionate belief in the empowerment of people, especially students, though teaching them to find, filter, and use information. For Baudrillard, there was a God behind that faith, and he is dead. I always read Baudrillard with a healthy dose of skepticism, because he took things to such extremes and wrote as if history had reached its endpoint. With all we are hearing now about rising sea levels, ocean acidification, and mass extinction, his words are seeming more relevant. For an idea about why the public largely ignores these issues, consider this passage:

The Abyss of Meaning

… Whatever its political, pedagogical, cultural content, the plan is always to get some meaning across, to keep the masses within reason; an imperative to produce meaning that takes the form of the constantly repeated imperative to moralise information: to better inform, to better socialise, to raise the cultural level of the masses, etc. Nonsense: the masses scandalously resist the imperative of rational communication. They are given meaning: they want spectacle. No effort has been able to convert them to the seriousness of the content, nor even to the seriousness of the code. Messages are given to them, they only want some sign, they idolise the play of signs and stereotypes, they idolise any content so long as it resolves itself into a spectacular sequence. What they reject is the “dialectic” of meaning. Nor is anything served by alleging that they are mystified. This is always a hypocritical hypothesis which protects the intellectual complaisance of the producers of meaning: the masses spontaneously aspire to the natural light of reason. This in order to evade the reverse hypothesis, namely that it is in complete “freedom” that the masses oppose their refusal of meaning and their will to spectacle to the ultimatum of meaning. They distrust, as with death, this transparency and this political will.They scent the simplifying terror which is behind the ideal hegemony of meaning, and they react in their own way, by reducing all articulate discourse to a single irrational and baseless dimension, where signs lose their meaning and peter out in fascination: the spectacular.

Baudrillard could have been talking about Facebook, but that was published in 1983, in a small book from Semiotext(e), In the Shadow of the Silent Majorities, pp. 9-11. The book is a pessimistic response to the likes of Habermas – or at least it seems pessimistic to someone who believes in Habermas. I’m not sure Baudrillard would have called himself a pessimist; he rather would have said he had made an adjustment to a new state of affairs.

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